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Epidemiology and prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infections in children in Italy

Overview of attention for article published in Italian Journal of Pediatrics, October 2021
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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45 Mendeley
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Title
Epidemiology and prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infections in children in Italy
Published in
Italian Journal of Pediatrics, October 2021
DOI 10.1186/s13052-021-01148-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chiara Azzari, Eugenio Baraldi, Paolo Bonanni, Elena Bozzola, Alessandra Coscia, Marcello Lanari, Paolo Manzoni, Teresa Mazzone, Fabrizio Sandri, Giovanni Checcucci Lisi, Salvatore Parisi, Giorgio Piacentini, Fabio Mosca

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading global cause of respiratory infections in infants and the second most frequent cause of death during the first year of life. This highly contagious seasonal virus is responsible for approximately 3 million hospitalizations and 120,000 deaths annually among children under the age of 5 years. Bronchiolitis is the most common severe manifestation; however, RSV infections are associated with an increased long-term risk for recurring wheezing and the development of asthma. There is an unmet need for new agents and a universal strategy to prevent RSV infections starting at the time of birth. RSV is active between November and April in Italy, and prevention strategies must ensure that all neonates and infants under 1 year of age are protected during the endemic season, regardless of gestational age at birth and timing of birth relative to the epidemic season. Approaches under development include maternal vaccines to protect neonates during their first months, monoclonal antibodies to provide immediate protection lasting up to 5 months, and pediatric vaccines for longer-lasting protection. Meanwhile, improvements are needed in infection surveillance and reporting to improve case identification and better characterize seasonal trends in infections along the Italian peninsula. Rapid diagnostic tests and confirmatory laboratory testing should be used for the differential diagnosis of respiratory pathogens in children. Stakeholders and policymakers must develop access pathways once new agents are available to reduce the burden of infections and hospitalizations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Unspecified 4 9%
Other 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 21 47%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Engineering 2 4%
Unspecified 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 25 56%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2021.
All research outputs
#13,460,063
of 20,832,782 outputs
Outputs from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#373
of 825 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,566
of 347,554 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Italian Journal of Pediatrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,832,782 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 825 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,554 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them