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Dietary patterns associated with body mass index (BMI) and lifestyle in Mexican adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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1 tweeter
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Citations

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40 Dimensions

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178 Mendeley
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Title
Dietary patterns associated with body mass index (BMI) and lifestyle in Mexican adolescents
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3527-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Elisa Gutiérrez-Pliego, Eneida del Socorro Camarillo-Romero, Laura Patricia Montenegro-Morales, José de Jesus Garduño-García

Abstract

The objetive in this study is to determine the relationship between dietary patterns, BMI, type 2 diabetes mellitus family history (T2DMFH) and some lifestyle variables such as smoking and skipping breakfast in a Mexican adolescent population. Cross-sectional, observational, analytical study.Subjetcts: 14-16 years old male and female adolescents (n 373). A previously validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used and dietary patterns were derived using principal component analysis (PCA). Scores for dietary patterns were categorized by tertiles. Three major dietary patterns that explained 47 % of variance were found: westernized, high in protein/fat and prudent pattern. Subjects at the highest tertile of prudent pattern had lower BMI. And was also associated with less T2DMFH and less smoking habit when compared with the lowest tertile. We found a positive correlation between BMI and high scores for westernized and high in protein/fat pattern Dietary patterns of adolescents are a public health concern because there is a direct association between inadequate diet at this early age and obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 178 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 176 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 39 22%
Student > Master 27 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 9%
Student > Postgraduate 11 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 6%
Other 25 14%
Unknown 50 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 39 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 37 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 4%
Social Sciences 7 4%
Other 21 12%
Unknown 57 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,020,125
of 8,324,953 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,766
of 6,997 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,026
of 252,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#301
of 358 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,324,953 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,997 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,028 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 358 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.