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Plasma cortisol and faecal cortisol metabolites concentrations in stereotypic and non-stereotypic horses: do stereotypic horses cope better with poor environmental conditions?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Veterinary Research, January 2013
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Title
Plasma cortisol and faecal cortisol metabolites concentrations in stereotypic and non-stereotypic horses: do stereotypic horses cope better with poor environmental conditions?
Published in
BMC Veterinary Research, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1746-6148-9-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carole Fureix, Haïfa Benhajali, Séverine Henry, Anaelle Bruchet, Armelle Prunier, Mohammed Ezzaouia, Caroline Coste, Martine Hausberger, Rupert Palme, Patrick Jego

Abstract

Stereotypic behaviours, i.e. repetitive behaviours induced by frustration, repeated attempts to cope and/or brain dysfunction, are intriguing as they occur in a variety of domestic and captive species without any clear adaptive function. Among the different hypotheses, the coping hypothesis predicts that stereotypic behaviours provide a way for animals in unfavourable environmental conditions to adjust. As such, they are expected to have a lower physiological stress level (glucocorticoids) than non-stereotypic animals. Attempts to link stereotypic behaviours with glucocorticoids however have yielded contradictory results. Here we investigated correlates of oral and motor stereotypic behaviours and glucocorticoid levels in two large samples of domestic horses (NStudy1 = 55, NStudy2 = 58), kept in sub-optimal conditions (e.g. confinement, social isolation), and already known to experience poor welfare states. Each horse was observed in its box using focal sampling (study 1) and instantaneous scan sampling (study 2). Plasma samples (collected in study 1) but also non-invasive faecal samples (collected in both studies) were retrieved in order to assess cortisol levels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 107 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 21 19%
Student > Master 20 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 13%
Researcher 8 7%
Student > Postgraduate 7 6%
Other 26 24%
Unknown 13 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 50 46%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 16 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 8%
Psychology 4 4%
Environmental Science 3 3%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 18 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2021.
All research outputs
#14,815,837
of 19,215,644 outputs
Outputs from BMC Veterinary Research
#1,431
of 2,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196,581
of 275,457 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Veterinary Research
#73
of 108 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,215,644 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,663 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,457 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.