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Randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention by primary care nurses to increase walking in patients aged 60–74 years: protocol of the PACE-Lift (Pedometer Accelerometer Consultation…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, January 2013
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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234 Mendeley
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Title
Randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention by primary care nurses to increase walking in patients aged 60–74 years: protocol of the PACE-Lift (Pedometer Accelerometer Consultation Evaluation - Lift) trial
Published in
BMC Public Health, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tess Harris, Sally Kerry, Christina Victor, Ulf Ekelund, Alison Woodcock, Steve Iliffe, Peter Whincup, Carole Beighton, Michael Ussher, Lee David, Debbie Brewin, Fredrika Adams, Annabelle Rogers, Derek Cook

Abstract

Physical activity is essential for older peoples' physical and mental health and for maintaining independence. Guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes weekly, of at least moderate intensity physical activity, with activity on most days. Older people's most common physical activity is walking, light intensity if strolling, moderate if brisker. Less than 20% of United Kingdom 65-74 year olds report achieving the guidelines, despite most being able to. Effective behaviour change techniques include strategies such as goal setting, self-monitoring, building self-efficacy and relapse prevention. Primary care physical activity consultations allow individual tailoring of advice. Pedometers measure step-counts and accelerometers measure physical activity intensity. This protocol describes an innovative intervention to increase walking in older people, incorporating pedometer and accelerometer feedback within a primary care nurse physical activity consultation, using behaviour change techniques.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 234 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 3 1%
United Kingdom 3 1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 225 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 46 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 18%
Researcher 32 14%
Student > Bachelor 23 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 7%
Other 40 17%
Unknown 33 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 64 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 37 16%
Psychology 23 10%
Sports and Recreations 20 9%
Social Sciences 13 6%
Other 30 13%
Unknown 47 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 January 2013.
All research outputs
#9,508,295
of 12,372,633 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,976
of 8,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,413
of 262,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#886
of 1,089 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,633 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,372 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,089 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.