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Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications for prevention strategies

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
121 Mendeley
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Title
Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications for prevention strategies
Published in
Environmental Health, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1476-069x-12-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elsie M Sunderland, Noelle E Selin

Abstract

In their new paper, Bellanger and coauthors show substantial economic impacts to the EU from neurocognitive impairment associated with methylmercury (MeHg) exposures. The main source of MeHg exposure is seafood consumption, including many marine species harvested from the global oceans. Fish, birds and other wildlife are also susceptible to the impacts of MeHg and already exceed toxicological thresholds in vulnerable regions like the Arctic. Most future emissions scenarios project a growth or stabilization of anthropogenic mercury releases relative to present-day levels. At these emissions levels, inputs of mercury to ecosystems are expected to increase substantially in the future, in part due to growth in the legacy reservoirs of mercury in oceanic and terrestrial ecosystems. Seawater mercury concentration trajectories in areas such as the North Pacific Ocean that supply large quantities of marine fish to the global seafood market are projected to increase by more than 50% by 2050. Fish mercury levels and subsequent human and biological exposures are likely to also increase because production of MeHg in ocean ecosystems is driven by the supply of available inorganic mercury, among other factors. Analyses that only consider changes in primary anthropogenic emissions are likely to underestimate the severity of future deposition and concentration increases associated with growth in mercury reservoirs in the land and ocean. We therefore recommend that future policy analyses consider the fully coupled interactions among short and long-lived reservoirs of mercury in the atmosphere, ocean, and terrestrial ecosystems. Aggressive anthropogenic emission reductions are needed to reduce MeHg exposures and associated health impacts on humans and wildlife and protect the integrity of one of the last wild-food sources globally. In the near-term, public health advice on safe fish consumption choices such as smaller species, younger fish, and harvests from relatively unpolluted ecosystems is needed to minimize exposure risks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 121 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 3%
Mexico 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 114 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 27 22%
Student > Master 22 18%
Student > Bachelor 18 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 12%
Other 8 7%
Other 18 15%
Unknown 14 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 29 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 10%
Chemistry 8 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 5%
Other 23 19%
Unknown 17 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2014.
All research outputs
#1,334,549
of 20,568,640 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#284
of 1,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,580
of 285,708 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#13
of 84 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,568,640 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,415 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,708 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 84 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.