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The effects of exposure to HIV in neonates at a referral hospital in South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, November 2021
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Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
The effects of exposure to HIV in neonates at a referral hospital in South Africa
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, November 2021
DOI 10.1186/s12887-021-02969-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helena Mellqvist, Robin T. Saggers, Anders Elfvin, Elisabet Hentz, Daynia E. Ballot

Abstract

Fewer infants are infected with HIV through mother-to-child transmission, making HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) infants a growing population. HIV-exposure seems to affect immunology, early growth and development, and is associated with higher morbidity and mortality rates. Currently, there is a lack of information regarding the clinical effects of HIV-exposure during the neonatal period. To identify a possible difference in mortality and common neonatal morbidities in HEU neonates compared to HIV-unexposed neonates. This was a retrospective, descriptive study of all neonates admitted to the neonatal unit at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital between 1 January 2017 and 31 December 2018. HEU neonates were compared to HIV-unexposed neonates. There were 3236 neonates included, where 855 neonates were HEU. The HEU neonates had significantly lower birth weight and gestational age. The HEU neonates had higher rates of neonatal sepsis (19.8% vs 14.2%, OR 1.49, p <  0.001), specifically for late onset sepsis, and required more respiratory support. NCPAP and invasive ventilation was more common in the HEU group (36.3% vs 31.3% required NCPAP, p = 0.008, and 20.1% vs 15,0% required invasive ventilation, p <  0.001). Chronic lung disease was more common among HIV-exposed neonates (12.2% vs 8.7%, OR 1.46, p = 0.003). The difference in mortality rates between the study groups was not significant (10.8% of HEU neonates and 13.3% of HIV-unexposed). HEU neonates had higher rates of neonatal sepsis, particularly late-onset sepsis, required more respiratory support and had higher rates of chronic lung disease. Mortality of HEU neonates was not different HIV-unexposed neonates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 13%
Other 2 9%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 4%
Lecturer 1 4%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 12 52%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 22%
Unspecified 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Psychology 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 12 52%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 November 2021.
All research outputs
#13,741,229
of 22,461,871 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#1,733
of 2,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,849
of 427,553 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#192
of 361 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,461,871 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,945 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 427,553 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 361 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.