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The assessment of circulating volume using inferior vena cava collapse index and carotid Doppler velocity time integral in healthy volunteers: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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55 Mendeley
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Title
The assessment of circulating volume using inferior vena cava collapse index and carotid Doppler velocity time integral in healthy volunteers: a pilot study
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13049-016-0298-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tom Peachey, Andrew Tang, Elinor C. Baker, Jason Pott, Yonathan Freund, Tim Harris

Abstract

Assessment of circulating volume and the requirement for fluid replacement are fundamental to resuscitation but remain largely empirical. Passive leg raise (PLR) may determine fluid responders while avoiding potential fluid overload. We hypothesised that inferior vena cava collapse index (IVCCI) and carotid artery blood flow would change predictably in response to PLR, potentially providing a non-invasive tool to assess circulating volume and identifying fluid responsive patients. We conducted a prospective proof of concept pilot study on fasted healthy volunteers. One operator measured IVC diameter during quiet respiration and sniff, and carotid artery flow. Stroke volume (SV) was also measured using suprasternal Doppler. Our primary endpoint was change in IVCCI after PLR. We also studied changes in IVCCI after "sniff", and correlation between carotid artery flow and SV. Passive leg raise was associated with significant reduction in the mean inferior vena cava collapsibility index from 0.24 to 0.17 (p < 0.01). Mean stroke volume increased from 56.0 to 69.2 mL (p < 0.01). There was no significant change in common carotid artery blood flow. Changes in physiology consequent upon passive leg raise normalised rapidly. Passive leg raise is associated with a decrease of IVCCI and increase in stroke volume. However, the wide range of values observed suggests that factors other than circulating volume predominate in determining the proportion of collapse with respiration. In contrast to other studies, we did not find that carotid blood flow increased with passive leg raise. Rapid normalisation of post-PLR physiology may account for this.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 54 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 15%
Student > Postgraduate 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 9%
Student > Master 5 9%
Other 14 25%
Unknown 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 58%
Engineering 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 4 7%
Unknown 13 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2018.
All research outputs
#1,130,525
of 14,009,143 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#106
of 875 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,546
of 262,798 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,009,143 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 875 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,798 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them