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Multi-regression analysis revealed a relationship between l-serine and methionine, a component of one-carbon metabolism, in the normal control but not in the schizophrenia

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of General Psychiatry, August 2016
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Title
Multi-regression analysis revealed a relationship between l-serine and methionine, a component of one-carbon metabolism, in the normal control but not in the schizophrenia
Published in
Annals of General Psychiatry, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12991-016-0113-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yumiko Takano, Yuji Ozeki, Masae Sekine, Kumiko Fujii, Takashi Watanabe, Hiroaki Okayasu, Takahiro Shinozaki, Akiko Aoki, Kazufumi Akiyama, Hiroshi Homma, Kazutaka Shimoda

Abstract

Alterations in one-carbon metabolism (OCM) have been observed in patients with schizophrenia (SZ), but a comprehensive study of OCM has not yet been conducted. A carbon atom is transferred from l-serine to methionine during OCM, but the relationship between l-serine and methionine in SZ is not yet known. We investigated the relationship between l-serine and methionine to obtain a comprehensive understanding of OCM in SZ. We recruited forty-five patients with SZ and thirty normal controls (NC). Whole blood, plasma, and DNA specimens were obtained from all participants. Plasma l-serine, d-serine, glycine, methionine, and total homocysteine levels were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Plasma vitamin B12 and total folate were measured using a chemiluminescent protein-binding immunoassay. Clinical symptoms were estimated using the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS). The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C667T genotype and A298C genotype, which are involved in MTHFR activity, were determined using the TaqMan genotyping assay system. Analysis of variance was used to confirm that the SZ cohort has higher plasma homocysteine levels and lower plasma folate levels than the NC group. Multi-regression analysis revealed a relationship between l-serine and methionine in the NC group but not in the SZ group. The MTHFR genotype did not affect the relationship between l-serine and methionine in each group. The total PANSS score was significantly related to d-serine and folate levels and to age. Positive PANSS scores were significantly related to both glycine and sex. In addition, both glycine and d-serine were significantly correlated with negative PANSS scores. We found impairment of the relationship between l-serine and methionine in SZ. Clinical symptoms of SZ were partially correlated with the OCM components. These findings contributed to our understanding of OCM alteration in SZ and may explain why the alteration occurs.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Other 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 4 27%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 4 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,032,921
of 8,342,643 outputs
Outputs from Annals of General Psychiatry
#181
of 264 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,076
of 252,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of General Psychiatry
#5
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,342,643 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 264 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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