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Assessing the asymptomatic reservoir and dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine effectiveness in a low transmission setting threatened by artemisinin resistant Plasmodium falciparum

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Assessing the asymptomatic reservoir and dihydroartemisinin–piperaquine effectiveness in a low transmission setting threatened by artemisinin resistant Plasmodium falciparum
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1487-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Grégoire Falq, Rafael Van Den Bergh, Martin De Smet, William Etienne, Chea Nguon, Huy Rekol, Mallika Imwong, Arjen Dondorp, Jean-Marie Kindermans

Abstract

In Cambodia, elimination of artemisinin resistance through direct elimination of the Plasmodium falciparum parasite may be the only strategy. Prevalence and incidence at district and village levels were assessed in Chey Saen district, Preah Vihear province, North of Cambodia. Molecular and clinical indicators for artemisinin resistance were documented. A cross sectional prevalence survey was conducted at village level in the district of Chey Saen from September to October 2014. Plasmodium spp. was assessed with high volume quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Plasmodium falciparum-positive samples were screened for mutations in the k13-propeller domain gene. Treatment effectiveness was established after 28 days (D28) using the same qPCR technique. Data from the provincial surveillance system targeting symptomatic cases, supported by Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), were used to assess incidence. District P. falciparum prevalence was of 0.74 % [0.41; 1.21]; village prevalence ranged from 0 to 4.6 % [1.4; 10.5]. The annual incidence of P. falciparum was 16.8 cases per 1000 inhabitants in the district; village incidence ranged from 1.3 to 54.9 for 1000 inhabitants. Two geographical clusters with high number of cases were identified by both approaches. The marker for artemisinin resistance was found in six samples out of the 11 tested (55 %). 34.9 % of qPCR blood analysis of symptomatic patients were still positive at D28. The overall low prevalence of P. falciparum was confirmed in Chey Saen district in Cambodia, while there were important variations between villages. Symptomatic cases had a different pattern and were likely acquired outside the villages. It illustrates the importance of prevalence surveys in targeting interventions for elimination. Mutations in the k13-propeller domain gene (C580Y), conferring artemisinin resistance, were highly prevalent in both symptomatic and asymptomatic cases (realizing the absolute figures remain low). Asymptomatic individuals could be an additional reservoir for artemisinin resistance. The low effectiveness of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ) for symptomatic cases indicates that PPQ is no longer able to complement the reduced potency of DHA to treat falciparum malaria and highlights the need for an alternative first-line treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Thailand 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 48 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 38%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Lecturer 3 6%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Computer Science 3 6%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 13 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2016.
All research outputs
#3,028,850
of 13,326,620 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#839
of 3,893 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,520
of 262,039 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,326,620 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,893 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,039 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them