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Drug-resistant tuberculosis in Central Mozambique: the role of a rapid genotypic susceptibility testing

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2016
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Title
Drug-resistant tuberculosis in Central Mozambique: the role of a rapid genotypic susceptibility testing
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1766-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Evangelina Inácio Namburete, Inês Tivane, Miguelhete Lisboa, Margarida Passeri, Renata Pocente, Josefo Joao Ferro, Lee H. Harrison, Valdes Roberto Bollela

Abstract

Genotypic molecular testing may be very helpful for tuberculosis (TB) drug-resistance surveillance and for treatment guidance in low resource settings. Descriptive analysis of M. tuberculosis isolates from Beira Central Hospital, Mozambique, during 2014-2015. Genotype MTBDRplus and MTBDRsl were used and patient medical records reviewed. To explore genotypic susceptibility profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, to first and second line drugs (SLD) in Beira Mozambique. Of 155 isolates, 16.1 % (25) were multidrug resistant (MDR), 8.4 % (13) isoniazid-monoresistant and 1.3 % (2) rifampicin-monoresistant. Among MDR-TB, 22.2 % showed primary and 77.8 % represented acquired resistance. The majority of patients with drug resistance had a history of previous TB treatment. Among 125 isolates tested for ethambutol and SLD, 7.2 % (9) were resistant to ethambutol, 4.8 % (6) to fluoroquinolones and 0.8 % (1) to ethambutol and fluoroquinolones. Resistance to injectable SLD was not detected. As far as we know this is the first report of a genotypic testing used to provide information about SLD resistance in Mozambique, where phenotypic susceptibility testing is usually unavailable. Extensively drug resistant TB was not detected in this isolates from Beira Mozambique.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 23%
Researcher 12 20%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 10 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 36%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 12 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,016,503
of 8,320,311 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,438
of 3,711 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,004
of 251,996 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#122
of 210 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,320,311 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,711 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,996 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 210 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.