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Interaction between interleukin-1β and type-1 cannabinoid receptor is involved in anxiety-like behavior in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#49 of 1,357)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
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Title
Interaction between interleukin-1β and type-1 cannabinoid receptor is involved in anxiety-like behavior in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12974-016-0682-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonietta Gentile, Diego Fresegna, Alessandra Musella, Helena Sepman, Silvia Bullitta, Francesca De Vito, Roberta Fantozzi, Alessandro Usiello, Mauro Maccarrone, Nicola B. Mercuri, Beat Lutz, Georgia Mandolesi, Diego Centonze

Abstract

Mood disorders, including anxiety and depression, are frequently diagnosed in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, even independently of the disabling symptoms associated with the disease. Anatomical, biochemical, and pharmacological evidence indicates that type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) is implicated in the control of emotional behavior and is modulated during inflammatory neurodegenerative diseases such as MS and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We investigated whether CB1R could exert a role in anxiety-like behavior in mice with EAE. We performed behavioral, pharmacological, and electrophysiological experiments to explore the link between central inflammation, mood, and CB1R function in EAE. We observed that EAE-induced anxiety was associated with the downregulation of CB1R-mediated control of striatal GABA synaptic transmission and was exacerbated in mice lacking CB1R (CB1R-KO mice). Central blockade of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) reversed the anxiety-like phenotype of EAE mice, an effect associated with the concomitant rescue of dopamine (DA)-regulated spontaneous behavior, and DA-CB1R neurotransmission, leading to the rescue of striatal CB1R sensitivity. Overall, results of the present investigation indicate that synaptic dysfunction linked to CB1R is involved in EAE-related anxiety and motivation-based behavior and contribute to clarify the complex neurobiological mechanisms underlying mood disorders associated to MS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 19%
Student > Bachelor 12 16%
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 8%
Other 13 17%
Unknown 13 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 20 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 19 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2017.
All research outputs
#664,525
of 11,862,957 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#49
of 1,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,221
of 259,856 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#3
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,862,957 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,357 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,856 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.