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A systematic review of the application and utility of geographical information systems for exploring disease-disease relationships in paediatric global health research: the case of anaemia and malaria

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2013
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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62 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
206 Mendeley
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Title
A systematic review of the application and utility of geographical information systems for exploring disease-disease relationships in paediatric global health research: the case of anaemia and malaria
Published in
International Journal of Health Geographics, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1476-072x-12-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ashley Mariko Aimone, Nandita Perumal, Donald C Cole

Abstract

Malaria and anaemia are important health problems among children globally. Iron deficiency anaemia may offer protection against malaria infection and iron supplementation may increase the risk of malaria-related hospitalization and mortality. The nature and mechanism of these relationships, however, remain largely unresolved, resulting in concern and uncertainty around policies for non-selective iron supplementation in malaria endemic areas. Use of geographical information systems (GIS) to investigate this disease-disease interaction could contribute important new information for developing safe and effective anaemia and malaria interventions. To assess the current state of knowledge we conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed and grey literature. Our primary objective was to qualitatively assess the application and utility of geographical concepts or spatial analyses in paediatric global health research. The secondary objective was to identify geographical factors that may be associated with anaemia and malaria prevalence or incidence among children 0-5 years of age living in low- and middle-income countries. Evaluation tools for assessing the quality of geographical data could not be found in the peer-reviewed or grey literature, and thus adapted versions of the STROBE (Strengthening The Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) and GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methods were used to create reporting, and overall evidence quality scoring systems. Among the 20 included studies, we found that both malaria and anaemia were more prevalent in rural communities compared to urban areas. Geographical factors associated with malaria prevalence included regional transmission stability, and proximity to a mosquito breeding area. The prevalence of anaemia tended to vary inversely with greater or poorer access to community services such as piped water. Techniques for investigating geographic relationships ranged from simple descriptive mapping of spatial distribution patterns, to more complex statistical models that incorporated environmental factors such as seasonal temperature and rain fall. Including GIS in paediatric global health research may be an effective approach to explore relationships between childhood diseases and contribute key evidence for safe implementation of anaemia control programs in malaria endemic areas. Further, GIS presentation of ecological health data could provide an efficient means of translating this knowledge to lay audiences.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 206 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 1%
Ghana 2 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Malawi 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Taiwan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Congo, The Democratic Republic of the 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 194 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 44 21%
Researcher 34 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 15%
Student > Bachelor 15 7%
Student > Postgraduate 14 7%
Other 37 18%
Unknown 31 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 10%
Social Sciences 18 9%
Computer Science 14 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 6%
Other 56 27%
Unknown 37 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2020.
All research outputs
#6,043,745
of 19,249,286 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Health Geographics
#241
of 610 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,616
of 275,775 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Health Geographics
#24
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,249,286 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 610 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,775 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.