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The trauma patient in hemorrhagic shock: how is the C-priority addressed between emergency and ICU admission?

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, December 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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Title
The trauma patient in hemorrhagic shock: how is the C-priority addressed between emergency and ICU admission?
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, December 2012
DOI 10.1186/1757-7241-20-78
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sigune Peiniger, Thomas Paffrath, Manuel Mutschler, Thomas Brockamp, Matthew Borgmann, Philip C Spinella, Bertil Bouillon, Marc Maegele

Abstract

Trauma is the leading cause of death in young people with an injury related mortality rate of 47.6/100,000 in European high income countries. Early deaths often result from rapidly evolving and deteriorating secondary complications e.g. shock, hypoxia or uncontrolled hemorrhage. The present study assessed how well ABC priorities (A: Airway, B: Breathing/Ventilation and C: Circulation with hemorrhage control) with focus on the C-priority including coagulation management are addressed during early trauma care and to what extent these priorities have been controlled for prior to ICU admission among patients arriving to the ER in states of moderate or severe hemorrhagic shock.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 2 4%
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 44 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 13%
Other 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Other 14 30%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 62%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Unspecified 1 2%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 12 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2013.
All research outputs
#1,873,825
of 4,507,144 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#160
of 361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,010
of 284,038 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#11
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,144 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 361 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,038 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.