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Overexpression of synuclein-γ predicts lack of benefit from radiotherapy for breast cancer patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, September 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

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2 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Overexpression of synuclein-γ predicts lack of benefit from radiotherapy for breast cancer patients
Published in
BMC Cancer, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12885-016-2750-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Li Min, Cheng Zhang, Ruolan Ma, Xiaofan Li, Hua Yuan, Yihao Li, Ruxuan Chen, Caiyun Liu, Jianping Guo, Like Qu, Chengchao Shou

Abstract

Although radiotherapy following mastectomy was demonstrated to reduce the recurring risk and improve the prognosis of patients with breast cancer, it is also notorious for comprehensive side effects, hence only a selected group of patients can benefit. Therefore, the screening of molecular markers capable of predicting the efficacy of radiotherapy is essential. We have established a cohort of 454 breast cancer cases and selected 238 patients with indications for postoperative radiotherapy. Synuclein-γ (SNCG) protein levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and SNCG status was retrospectively correlated with clinical features and survival in patients treated or not treated with radiotherapy. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and survival analysis for online datasets were also performed for further validation. Among patients that received radiotherapy (82/238), those demonstrating positive SNCG expression had a 55.0 month shorter median overall survival (OS) in comparison to those demonstrating negative SNCG expression (78.4 vs. 133.4 months, log rank χ (2)  = 16.13; p < 0.001). Among the patients that received no radiotherapy (156/238), SNCG status was not correlated with OS (log rank χ (2)  = 2.40; p = 0.121). A COX proportional hazard analysis confirmed SNCG as an independent predictor of OS, only for patients who have received radiotherapy. Similar results were also obtained for distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). A GSEA analysis indicated that SNCG was strongly associated with genes related to a radiation stress response. A survival analysis was performed with online databases consisting of breast cancer, lung cancer, and glioblastoma and further confirmed SNCG's significance in predicting the survival of patients that have received radiotherapy. A positive SNCG may serve as a potential marker to identify breast cancer patients who are less likely to benefit from radiotherapy and may also be extended to other types of cancer. However, the role of SNCG in radiotherapy response still needs to be further validated in randomized controlled trials prior to being exploited in clinical practice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Researcher 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 7 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Unspecified 2 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 11 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2016.
All research outputs
#4,462,338
of 8,366,012 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,545
of 3,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,180
of 252,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#79
of 198 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,366,012 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,515 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,771 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 198 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.