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Self-controllable prodromal symptoms of syncope attributed to carotid sinus syndrome during the end stage of cancer: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in BioPsychoSocial Medicine, September 2016
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Title
Self-controllable prodromal symptoms of syncope attributed to carotid sinus syndrome during the end stage of cancer: a case report
Published in
BioPsychoSocial Medicine, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13030-016-0078-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hideaki Hasuo, Kenji Kanbara, Hiroko Sakuma, Rie Matsumori, Mikihiko Fukunaga

Abstract

Carotid sinus syndrome (CSS) can cause prodromal symptoms of syncope such as dizziness and nausea. Patients with end-stage cancer lose self-efficacy associated with reduced activities of daily life (ADL). Herein, we report a case of end-stage cancer in which self-efficacy was enhanced as the patient gained self-control of prodromal symptoms of syncope. A 70-year-old patient with end-stage esophageal cancer and enlarged supraclavicular lymph nodes developed CSS. The CSS was a mixed type with both bradycardia and decreased blood pressure, accompanied by prodromal symptoms prior to syncope episodes. The patient incidentally discovered that he could decrease the duration of symptoms by contracting the muscles in his hands and legs. By applying this coping method at the onset of prodromal symptoms, he was also able to reduce the severity and duration of symptoms, which resulted in enhanced self-efficacy. As a result, the frequency of prodromal symptoms also decreased even though ADL improved. This patient was diagnosed with vasoinhibitory-predominant mixed-type CSS. The coping method the patient developed seemed to avoid the onset of abrupt blood pressure decrease via peripheral vascular constriction action. Achievement of adequate coping such as self-control of prodromal symptoms enabled our patient to improve his self-efficacy even at the end stages of cancer. This case of enhanced self-efficacy could possibly illustrate a placebo effect for prevention of recurrence.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 9%
Unknown 10 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Professor 1 9%
Lecturer 1 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Unknown 3 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 27%
Psychology 1 9%
Sports and Recreations 1 9%
Neuroscience 1 9%
Engineering 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,335,784
of 8,348,788 outputs
Outputs from BioPsychoSocial Medicine
#132
of 175 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,475
of 252,659 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BioPsychoSocial Medicine
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,348,788 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 175 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,659 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.