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Bidirectional associations between psychosocial well-being and body mass index in European children: longitudinal findings from the IDEFICS study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2016
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Title
Bidirectional associations between psychosocial well-being and body mass index in European children: longitudinal findings from the IDEFICS study
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3626-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Monica Hunsberger, Susanna Lehtinen-Jacks, Kirsten Mehlig, Wencke Gwozdz, Paola Russo, Nathalie Michels, Karin Bammann, Iris Pigeot, Juan Miguel Fernández-Alvira, Barbara Franziska Thumann, Dénes Molnar, Toomas Veidebaum, Charalambos Hadjigeorgiou, Lauren Lissner

Abstract

The negative impact of childhood overweight on psychosocial well-being has been demonstrated in a number of studies. There is also evidence that psychosocial well-being may influence future overweight. We examined the bidirectional association between childhood overweight and psychosocial well-being in children from a large European cohort. The dual aim was to investigate the chronology of associations between overweight and psychosocial health indicators and the extent to which these associations may be explained by parental education. Participants from the IDEFICS study were recruited from eight countries between September 2007 and June 2008 when the children were aged 2 to 9.9 years old. Children and families provided data on lifestyle, psychosocial well-being, and measured anthropometry at baseline and at follow-up 2 years later. This study includes children with weight, height, and psychosocial well-being measurements at both time points (n = 7,831). Psychosocial well-being was measured by the KINDL® and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire respectively. The first instrument measures health-related quality of life including emotional well-being, self-esteem, parent relations and social relations while the second measures well-being based on emotional symptoms, conduct problems and peer-related problems. Logistic regression was used for modeling longitudinal associations. Children who were overweight at baseline had increased risk of poor health-related quality of life (odds ratio (OR) = 1.23; 95 % confidence interval (CI):1.03-1.48) measured 2 years later; this association was unidirectional. In contrast to health-related quality of life, poor well-being at baseline was associated with increased risk of overweight (OR = 1.39; 95 % CI:1.03-1.86) at 2 year follow-up; this association was also only observed in one direction. Adjustment for parental education did not change our findings. Our findings indicate that the association between overweight and psychosocial well-being may be bidirectional but varies by assessment measures. Future research should further investigate which aspects of psychosocial well-being are most likely to precede overweight and which are more likely to be consequences of overweight.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 95 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Researcher 8 8%
Student > Bachelor 6 6%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 30 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 20 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 17%
Psychology 14 15%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Sports and Recreations 3 3%
Other 6 6%
Unknown 32 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,718,159
of 12,154,160 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#7,063
of 8,222 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,211
of 260,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#283
of 329 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,154,160 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,222 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 329 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.