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Factors associated with optimal pharmacy refill adherence for antiretroviral medications and plasma HIV RNA non-detectability among HIV-positive crack cocaine users: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

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7 tweeters

Citations

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65 Mendeley
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Title
Factors associated with optimal pharmacy refill adherence for antiretroviral medications and plasma HIV RNA non-detectability among HIV-positive crack cocaine users: a prospective cohort study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1749-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kanna Hayashi, Evan Wood, Thomas Kerr, Huiru Dong, Paul Nguyen, Cathy M. Puskas, Silvia Guillemi, Julio S. G. Montaner, Michael-John Milloy

Abstract

Crack cocaine use is known to contribute to poor adherence to antiretroviral medications; however, little is known about facilitators of or barriers to effective HIV treatment use among HIV-infected crack cocaine users. We sought to identify correlates of optimal pharmacy refill adherence for antiretroviral medications and plasma HIV RNA viral load (pVL) suppression among this population. Data from a prospective cohort of HIV-positive people who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada, were linked to comprehensive HIV clinical monitoring and pharmacy dispensation records. We used multivariable generalized linear mixed-effects modelling to longitudinally identify factors associated with ≥95 % adherence to pharmacy refills for antiretroviral medications and pVL <50 copies/mL among crack cocaine users exposed to highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Among 438 HAART-exposed crack cocaine users between 2005 and 2013, 240 (54.8 %) had ≥95 % pharmacy refill adherence in the previous 6 months at baseline. In multivariable analyses, homelessness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 0.58), ≥daily crack cocaine smoking (AOR: 0.64), and ≥ daily heroin use (AOR: 0.43) were independently associated with optimal pharmacy refill adherence (all p < 0.05). The results for pVL non-detectability were consistent with those of medication adherence, except that longer history of HAART (AOR: 1.06), receiving a single tablet-per-day regimen (AOR: 3.02) and participation in opioid substitution therapies was independently associated with pVL non-detectability (AOR: 1.55) (all p < 0.05). Homelessness, and daily crack cocaine and/or heroin use were independently and negatively associated with optimal HAART-related outcomes. With the exception of opioid substitution therapies, no addiction treatment modalities assessed appeared to facilitate medication adherence or viral suppression. Evidence-based treatment options for crack cocaine use that also confer benefits to HAART need to be developed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Researcher 8 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 13 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 17 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 25%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 5%
Psychology 3 5%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 16 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2016.
All research outputs
#7,294,158
of 13,818,870 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,867
of 5,148 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,325
of 263,806 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,818,870 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,148 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,806 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them