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Implementing training and support, financial reimbursement, and referral to an internet-based brief advice program to improve the early identification of hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption in…

Overview of attention for article published in Implementation Science, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
202 Mendeley
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Title
Implementing training and support, financial reimbursement, and referral to an internet-based brief advice program to improve the early identification of hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption in primary care (ODHIN): study protocol for a cluster randomized factorial trial
Published in
Implementation Science, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1748-5908-8-11
Pubmed ID
Authors

Myrna N Keurhorst, Peter Anderson, Fredrik Spak, Preben Bendtsen, Lidia Segura, Joan Colom, Jillian Reynolds, Colin Drummond, Paolo Deluca, Ben van Steenkiste, Artur Mierzecki, Karolina Kłoda, Paul Wallace, Dorothy Newbury-Birch, Eileen Kaner, Toni Gual, Miranda GH Laurant

Abstract

The European level of alcohol consumption, and the subsequent burden of disease, is high compared to the rest of the world. While screening and brief interventions in primary healthcare are cost-effective, in most countries they have hardly been implemented in routine primary healthcare. In this study, we aim to examine the effectiveness and efficiency of three implementation interventions that have been chosen to address key barriers for improvement: training and support to address lack of knowledge and motivation in healthcare providers; financial reimbursement to compensate the time investment; and internet-based counselling to reduce workload for primary care providers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 202 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 195 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 40 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 13%
Student > Master 21 10%
Other 17 8%
Student > Bachelor 17 8%
Other 40 20%
Unknown 41 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 59 29%
Psychology 29 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 12%
Social Sciences 17 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 6 3%
Other 19 9%
Unknown 47 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 June 2013.
All research outputs
#4,287,881
of 21,342,999 outputs
Outputs from Implementation Science
#914
of 1,682 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,551
of 277,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Implementation Science
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,342,999 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,682 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.7. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,924 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them