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Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar infection in Mexican school children: genotyping and phylogenetic relationship

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2016
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Title
Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar infection in Mexican school children: genotyping and phylogenetic relationship
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-1812-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liliana Rojas, Patricia Morán, Alicia Valadez, Alejandro Gómez, Enrique González, Eric Hernández, Oswaldo Partida, Miriam Nieves, Marco Gudiño, Ulises Magaña, Javier Torres, Cecilia Ximénez

Abstract

This study aimed to determine the frequency of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar infection in school children in the community of Tlaltizapan, in order to understand the dynamics of infection within the school and family spheres of this population. Amoebiasis is an unsolved public health problem and an endemic disease in Mexico. The incidence rate varies depending on the state; the most affected states show the highest numbers of new cases of amoebiasis per year. Previously, we reported the molecular frequency of infection with E. histolytica and/or E. dispar in other rural communities of the state of Morelos. Children from 3 schools were studied to estimate the frequency of intestinal parasites through microscopic examination of fresh stool samples. The number of studied individuals were 309 school children. The molecular characterization of E. histolytica or E. dispar was carried out by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) using species-specific primers to amplify short tandem repeats (STR) in non-coding sequences associated with the tRNA gene; the amplified fragments were sequenced and analyzed. Eight different genotypes were obtained from E. dispar isolates with the molecular marker NKD3-D5. None of the cases in which the species E. histolytica was detected developed symptoms attributable to an invasive process of disease. Moreover, the parasitized condition appeared to have no significant impact on the development or nutritional status of affected children. Genotype 1, which corresponds to the reference strain E. dispar SAW760, considered a non-pathogenic amoeba, was the most prevalent. The comparison of the genotypes of Entamoeba species did not show a correlation between children and their relatives. In this community, the species Entamoeba dispar genotype 1 was the most widespread. Based on the indicators of growth, development and nutrition status, the studied community seems to be reasonably adapted to constant exposure to intestinal parasites, since there were no evidences of a serious impact of the parasitized condition on the children's health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 17%
Researcher 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Lecturer 5 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 20 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 9%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 23 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2016.
All research outputs
#12,339,253
of 13,946,582 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#4,433
of 5,205 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,343
of 263,984 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
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