↓ Skip to main content

Genome-wide identification and characterisation of HOT regions in the human genome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, September 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Genome-wide identification and characterisation of HOT regions in the human genome
Published in
BMC Genomics, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-3077-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hao Li, Feng Liu, Chao Ren, Xiaochen Bo, Wenjie Shu

Abstract

HOT (high-occupancy target) regions, which are bound by a surprisingly large number of transcription factors, are considered to be among the most intriguing findings of recent years. An improved understanding of the roles that HOT regions play in biology would be afforded by knowing the constellation of factors that constitute these domains and by identifying HOT regions across the spectrum of human cell types. We characterised and validated HOT regions in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and produced a catalogue of HOT regions in a broad range of human cell types. We found that HOT regions are associated with genes that control and define the developmental processes of the respective cell and tissue types. We also showed evidence of the developmental persistence of HOT regions at primitive enhancers and demonstrate unique signatures of HOT regions that distinguish them from typical enhancers and super-enhancers. Finally, we performed a dynamic analysis to reveal the dynamical regulation of HOT regions upon H1 differentiation. Taken together, our results provide a resource for the functional exploration of HOT regions and extend our understanding of the key roles of HOT regions in development and differentiation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Russia 1 4%
China 1 4%
Unknown 22 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 20%
Student > Postgraduate 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 3 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 32%
Computer Science 2 8%
Sports and Recreations 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2017.
All research outputs
#2,935,729
of 12,838,729 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,551
of 7,542 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,915
of 263,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#11
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,838,729 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,542 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,173 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.