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Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers: era of "MR Conditional" designs

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), October 2011
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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79 Dimensions

Readers on

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134 Mendeley
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Title
Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers: era of "MR Conditional" designs
Published in
Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), October 2011
DOI 10.1186/1532-429x-13-63
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jerold S Shinbane, Patrick M Colletti, Frank G Shellock

Abstract

Advances in cardiac device technology have led to the first generation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) conditional devices, providing more diagnostic imaging options for patients with these devices, but also new controversies. Prior studies of pacemakers in patients undergoing MRI procedures have provided groundwork for design improvements. Factors related to magnetic field interactions and transfer of electromagnetic energy led to specific design changes. Ferromagnetic content was minimized. Reed switches were modified. Leads were redesigned to reduce induced currents/heating. Circuitry filters and shielding were implemented to impede or limit the transfer of certain unwanted electromagnetic effects. Prospective multicenter clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of the first generation of MR conditional cardiac pacemakers demonstrated no significant alterations in pacing parameters compared to controls. There were no reported complications through the one month visit including no arrhythmias, electrical reset, inhibition of generator output, or adverse sensations. The safe implementation of these new technologies requires an understanding of the well-defined patient and MR system conditions. Although scanning a patient with an MR conditional device following the strictly defined patient and MR system conditions appears straightforward, issues related to patients with pre-existing devices remain complex. Until MR conditional devices are the routine platform for all of these devices, there will still be challenging decisions regarding imaging patients with pre-existing devices where MRI is required to diagnose and manage a potentially life threatening or serious scenario. A range of other devices including ICDs, biventricular devices, and implantable physiologic monitors as well as guidance of medical procedures using MRI technology will require further biomedical device design changes and testing. The development and implementation of cardiac MR conditional devices will continue to require the expertise and collaboration of multiple disciplines and will need to prove safety, effectiveness, and cost effectiveness in patient care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
France 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 124 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 28 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 16%
Student > Master 11 8%
Student > Bachelor 11 8%
Other 10 7%
Other 30 22%
Unknown 22 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 62 46%
Engineering 17 13%
Physics and Astronomy 12 9%
Neuroscience 4 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Other 11 8%
Unknown 25 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 May 2022.
All research outputs
#13,875,022
of 21,347,849 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#947
of 1,226 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#170,841
of 280,486 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#4
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,347,849 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,226 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,486 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.