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Impact of the Mass Drug Administration for malaria in response to the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 4,830)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
twitter
5 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
114 Mendeley
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Title
Impact of the Mass Drug Administration for malaria in response to the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1493-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maru Aregawi, Samuel J. Smith, Musa Sillah-Kanu, John Seppeh, Anitta R. Y. Kamara, Ryan O. Williams, John J. Aponte, Andrea Bosman, Pedro Alonso

Abstract

As emergency response to the Ebola epidemic, the Government of Sierra Leone and its partners implemented a large-scale Mass Drug Administration (MDA) with artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) covering >2.7 million people in the districts hardest hit by Ebola during December 2014-January 2015. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) evaluated the impact of the MDA on malaria morbidity at health facilities and the number of Ebola alerts received at District Ebola Command Centres. The coverage of the two rounds of MDA with ASAQ was estimated by relating the number anti-malarial medicines distributed to the estimated resident population. Segmented time-series analysis was applied to weekly data collected from 49 primary health units (PHUs) and 11 hospitals performing malaria parasitological testing during the study period, to evaluate trends of malaria cases and Ebola alerts during the post-MDA weeks compared to the pre-MDA weeks in MDA- and non-MDA-cheifdoms. After two rounds of the MDA, the number of suspected cases tested with rapid diagnostic test (RDT) decreased significantly by 43 % (95 % CI 38-48 %) at week 1 and remained low at week 2 and 3 post-first MDA and at week 1 and 3 post-second MDA; RDT positive cases decreased significantly by 47 % (41-52 %) at week 1 post-first and remained lower throughout all post-MDA weeks; and the RDT test positivity rate (TPR) declined by 35 % (32-38 %) at week 2 and stayed low throughout all post-MDA weeks. The total malaria (clinical + confirmed) cases decreased significantly by 45 % (39-52 %) at week 1 and were lower at week 2 and 3 post-first MDA; and week 1 post-second MDA. The proportion of confirmed malaria cases (out of all-outpatients) fell by 33 % (29-38 %) at week 1 post-first MDA and were lower during all post-MDA weeks. On the contrary, the non-malaria outpatient cases (cases due to other health conditions) either remained unchanged or fluctuated insignificantly. The Ebola alerts decreased by 30 % (13-46 %) at week 1 post-first MDA and much lower during all the weeks post-second MDA. The MDA achieved its goals of reducing malaria morbidity and febrile cases that would have been potentially diagnosed as suspected Ebola cases with increased risk of nosocomial infections. The intervention also helped reduce patient case-load to the severely strained health services at the peak of the Ebola outbreak and malaria transmission. As expected, the effect of the MDA waned in a matter of few weeks and malaria intensity returned to the pre-MDA levels. Nevertheless, the approach was an appropriate public health intervention in the context of the Ebola epidemic even in high malaria transmission areas of Sierra Leone.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 114 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 114 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 20%
Student > Master 22 19%
Student > Bachelor 13 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 10%
Other 8 7%
Other 14 12%
Unknown 23 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 16%
Social Sciences 14 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 4%
Other 17 15%
Unknown 29 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 95. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2020.
All research outputs
#264,467
of 17,595,144 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#25
of 4,830 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,380
of 275,841 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,595,144 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,830 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,841 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them