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Mammographic density and risk of breast cancer according to tumor characteristics and mode of detection: a Spanish population-based case-control study

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research, January 2013
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1 tweeter
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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70 Dimensions

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76 Mendeley
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Title
Mammographic density and risk of breast cancer according to tumor characteristics and mode of detection: a Spanish population-based case-control study
Published in
Breast Cancer Research, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/bcr3380
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marina Pollán, Nieves Ascunce, María Ederra, Alberto Murillo, Nieves Erdozáin, Jose Enrique Alés-Martínez, Roberto Pastor-Barriuso

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: It is not clear whether high mammographic density (MD) is equally associated with all subtypes of breast cancer (BC). We investigated the association between MD and subsequent BC, considering invasiveness, means of detection, pathologic subtype, and the time elapsed since mammographic exploration and BC diagnosis. METHODS: BC cases occurring in the population of women who attended screening from 1997 through 2004 in Navarre, a Spanish region with a fully consolidated screening program, were identified via record linkage with the Navarre Cancer Registry (n = 1,172). Information was extracted from the records of their first attendance at screening in that period. For each case, we randomly selected four controls, matched by screening round, year of birth, and place of residence. Cases were classified according to invasiveness (ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) versus invasive tumors), pathologic subtype (considering hormonal receptors and HER2), and type of diagnosis (screen-detected versus interval cases). MD was evaluated by a single, experienced radiologist by using a semiquantitative scale. Data on BC risk factors were obtained by the screening program in the corresponding round. The association between MD and tumor subtype was assessed by using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: MD was clearly associated with subsequent BC. The odds ratio (OR) for the highest MD category (MD >75%) compared with the reference category (MD <10%) was similar for DCIS (OR = 3.47; 95% CI = 1.46 to 8.27) and invasive tumors (OR = 2.95; 95% CI = 2.01 to 4.35). The excess risk was particularly high for interval cases (OR = 7.72; 95% CI = 4.02 to 14.81) in comparison with screened detected tumors (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.40 to 3.36). Sensitivity analyses excluding interval cases diagnosed in the first year after MD assessment or immediately after an early recall to screening yielded similar results. No differences were seen regarding pathologic subtypes. The excess risk associated with MD persisted for at least 7 to 8 years after mammographic exploration. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm that MD is an important risk factor for all types of breast cancer. High breast density strongly increases the risk of developing an interval tumor, and this excess risk is not completely explained by a possible masking effect.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Egypt 1 1%
Unknown 74 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 18%
Student > Master 10 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Professor 6 8%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 18 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 5%
Physics and Astronomy 4 5%
Computer Science 4 5%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 22 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2013.
All research outputs
#9,782,252
of 16,578,610 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research
#1,109
of 1,698 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,579
of 252,863 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research
#11
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,578,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,698 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,863 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.