↓ Skip to main content

The associations of cumulative adverse childhood experiences and irritability with mental disorders in detained male adolescent offenders

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, September 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
189 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The associations of cumulative adverse childhood experiences and irritability with mental disorders in detained male adolescent offenders
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13034-016-0122-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannes Bielas, Steffen Barra, Christine Skrivanek, Marcel Aebi, Hans-Christoph Steinhausen, Cornelia Bessler, Belinda Plattner

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and psychiatric disorders are common in juvenile detainees. Emotional dysregulation resulting from cumulated ACEs may be characterized by symptoms of irritability. The present study examined whether the accumulation of ACEs, irritability, or both predicted mental disorders in incarcerated adolescents with and without controlling for one another and for socio-demographic factors. One hundred thirty male detained juvenile offenders (aged 13.8-19.5 years) were assessed by structured clinical interviews and a self-reporting scale for irritability. Univariate and multivariate regression models were used to examine the shared and distinct associations of ACEs and irritability with psychiatric diagnoses. A total of 75 % of the participants reported more than one ACE. The ACE total score was positively related to self-reported irritability. The ACE total score predicted depressive disorders, suicidality, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and anxiety disorders. Irritability was positively related to depressive disorders, suicidality, disruptive behavior disorder (DBD), substance use disorder (SUD), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These associations remained significant in multivariate models. This study provides evidence for the predictive impact of self-reported ACEs and irritability with regard to adolescent psychiatric disorders in young male inmates. Both variables differed in their predictive power for PTSD, internalizing, and externalizing disorders indicating the need for specific therapeutic interventions. Taking a close look at their trauma history seems to be of special importance for juveniles suffering from PTSD and anxiety disorders. For delinquent adolescents with DBD, ADHD and SUD, the training of emotion regulation techniques appears most promising. Approaches focusing on both, ACEs and emotion-focused contents may be implemented in the treatment of depressive disorders and suicidality.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 189 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 188 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 14%
Researcher 23 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 22 12%
Student > Bachelor 21 11%
Other 24 13%
Unknown 44 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 81 43%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 13%
Social Sciences 15 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 4%
Neuroscience 4 2%
Other 14 7%
Unknown 44 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2017.
All research outputs
#4,397,060
of 14,537,474 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#200
of 474 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,178
of 266,830 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,537,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 474 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,830 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.