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Abdominal intra-compartment syndrome – a non-hydraulic model of abdominal compartment syndrome due to post-hepatectomy hemorrhage in a man with a localized frozen abdomen due to extensive adhesions…

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Medical Case Reports, September 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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3 Dimensions

Readers on

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Abdominal intra-compartment syndrome – a non-hydraulic model of abdominal compartment syndrome due to post-hepatectomy hemorrhage in a man with a localized frozen abdomen due to extensive adhesions: a case report
Published in
Journal of Medical Case Reports, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13256-016-1045-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexsander K. Bressan, Andrew W. Kirkpatrick, Chad G. Ball

Abstract

Postoperative hemorrhage is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality following liver resection. It typically presents early within the postoperative period, and conservative management is possible in the majority of cases. We present a case of late post-hepatectomy hemorrhage associated with overt abdominal compartment syndrome resulting from a localized functional compartment within the abdomen. A 68-year-old white man was readmitted with sudden onset of upper abdominal pain, vomiting, and hemodynamic instability 8 days after an uneventful hepatic resection for metachronous colon cancer metastasis. A frozen abdomen with adhesions due to complicated previous abdominal surgeries was encountered at the first intervention, but the surgery itself and initial recovery were otherwise unremarkable. Prompt response to fluid resuscitation at admission was followed by a computed tomography of his abdomen that revealed active arterial hemorrhage in the liver resection site and hemoperitoneum (estimated volume <2 L). Selective arteriography successfully identified and embolized a small bleeding branch of his right hepatic artery. He remained hemodynamically stable, but eventually developed overt abdominal compartment syndrome. Surgical exploration confirmed a small volume of ascites and blood clots (1.2 L) under significant pressure in his supramesocolic region, restricted by his frozen lower abdomen, which we evacuated. Dramatic improvement in his ventilatory pressure was immediate. His abdomen was left open and a negative pressure device was placed for temporary abdominal closure. The fascia was formally closed after 48 hours. He was discharged home at postoperative day 6. Intra-abdominal pressure and radiologic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage should be carefully interpreted in patients with extensive intra-abdominal adhesions. A high index of suspicion and detailed understanding of abdominal compartment mechanics are paramount for the timely diagnosis of abdominal compartment syndrome in these patients. Clinicians should be aware that abnormal anatomy (such as adhesions) coupled with localized pathophysiology (such as hemorrhage) can create a so-named abdominal intra-compartment syndrome requiring extra vigilance to diagnose.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Researcher 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 7 23%
Unknown 6 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 43%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 10 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 December 2016.
All research outputs
#6,701,203
of 11,329,665 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#542
of 1,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,461
of 260,289 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Medical Case Reports
#19
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,329,665 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,684 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,289 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.