↓ Skip to main content

The connection between the primary care and the physical activity sector: professionals’ perceptions

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
2 policy sources
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
31 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The connection between the primary care and the physical activity sector: professionals’ perceptions
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3665-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karlijn E. F. Leenaars, Annemiek M. E. Florisson, Eva Smit, Annemarie Wagemakers, Gerard R. M. Molleman, Maria A. Koelen

Abstract

To stimulate physical activity (PA) and guide primary care patients towards local PA facilities, Care Sport Connectors (CSC), to whom a broker role has been ascribed, were introduced in 2012 in the Netherlands. The aim of this study is to assess perceptions of primary care, welfare, and sport professionals towards the CSC role and the connection between the primary care and the PA sector. Nine focus groups were held with primary care, welfare and sport professionals within the CSC network. In these focus groups the CSC role and the connection between the sectors were discussed. Both top-down and bottom-up codes were used to analyse the focus groups. Professionals ascribed three roles to the CSC: 1) broker role, 2) referral, 3) facilitator. Professionals were enthusiastic about how the current connection was established. However, barriers relating to their own sector were currently hindering the connection: primary care professionals' lack of time, money and knowledge, and the lack of suitable PA activities and instructors for the target group. This study provides further insight into the CSC role and the connection between the sectors from the point of view of primary care, welfare, and sport professionals. Professionals found the CSC role promising, but barriers are currently hindering the collaboration between both sectors. More time for the CSC and changes in the way the primary care and PA sector are organized seem to be necessary to overcome the identified barriers and to make a success of the connection. Dutch Trial register NTR4986 . Registered 14 December 2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 19%
Student > Master 6 19%
Other 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Other 7 23%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 7 23%
Sports and Recreations 5 16%
Social Sciences 5 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 13%
Psychology 3 10%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2017.
All research outputs
#2,010,199
of 12,317,848 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,349
of 8,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,746
of 264,872 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#76
of 266 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,317,848 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,338 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,872 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 266 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.