↓ Skip to main content

The effect of declining exposure on T cell-mediated immunity to Plasmodium falciparum – an epidemiological “natural experiment”

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, September 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The effect of declining exposure on T cell-mediated immunity to Plasmodium falciparum – an epidemiological “natural experiment”
Published in
BMC Medicine, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12916-016-0683-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yaw Bediako, Joyce Mwongeli Ngoi, George Nyangweso, Juliana Wambua, Michael Opiyo, Eunice Wambui Nduati, Philip Bejon, Kevin Marsh, Francis Maina Ndungu

Abstract

Naturally acquired immunity to malaria may be lost with lack of exposure. Recent heterogeneous reductions in transmission in parts of Africa mean that large populations of previously protected people may lose their immunity while remaining at risk of infection. Using two ethnically similar long-term cohorts of children with historically similar levels of exposure to Plasmodium falciparum who now experience very different levels of exposure, we assessed the effect of decreased parasite exposure on antimalarial immunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from children in each cohort were stimulated with P. falciparum and their P. falciparum-specific proliferative and cytokine responses were compared. We demonstrate that, while P. falciparum-specific CD4(+) T cells are maintained in the absence of exposure, the proliferative capacity of these cells is altered considerably. P. falciparum-specific CD4(+) T cells isolated from children previously exposed, but now living in an area of minimal exposure ("historically exposed") proliferate significantly more upon stimulation than cells isolated from children continually exposed to the parasite. Similarly, PBMCs from historically exposed children expressed higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lower levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines after stimulation with P. falciparum. Notably, we found a significant positive association between duration since last febrile episode and P. falciparum-specific CD4(+) T cell proliferation, with more recent febrile episodes associated with lower proliferation. Considered in the context of existing knowledge, these data suggest a model explaining how immunity is lost in absence of continuing exposure to P. falciparum.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 19%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 16 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,478,154
of 8,497,409 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,339
of 1,656 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,779
of 254,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#48
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,497,409 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,656 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.3. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.