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High lability of sexual system over 250 million years of evolution in morphologically conservative tadpole shrimps

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
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Title
High lability of sexual system over 250 million years of evolution in morphologically conservative tadpole shrimps
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-13-30
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas C Mathers, Robert L Hammond, Ronald A Jenner, Thorid Zierold, Bernd Hänfling, Africa Gómez

Abstract

Sexual system is a key factor affecting the genetic diversity, population structure, genome structure and the evolutionary potential of species. The sexual system androdioecy - where males and hermaphrodites coexist in populations - is extremely rare, yet is found in three crustacean groups, barnacles, a genus of clam shrimps Eulimnadia, and in the order Notostraca, the tadpole shrimps. In the ancient crustacean order Notostraca, high morphological conservatism contrasts with a wide diversity of sexual systems, including androdioecy. An understanding of the evolution of sexual systems in this group has been hampered by poor phylogenetic resolution and confounded by the widespread occurrence of cryptic species. Here we use a multigene supermatrix for 30 taxa to produce a comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction of Notostraca. Based on this phylogenetic reconstruction we use character mapping techniques to investigate the evolution of sexual systems. We also tested the hypothesis that reproductive assurance has driven the evolution of androdioecy in Notostraca.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
Norway 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 47 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Student > Master 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 62%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 12 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2019.
All research outputs
#2,523,177
of 22,619,880 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#581
of 2,906 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,232
of 297,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#34
of 208 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,619,880 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,906 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 297,935 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 208 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.