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Exploiting indigenous knowledge of subsistence farmers’ for the management and conservation of Enset (Ensete ventricosum (Welw.) Cheesman) (musaceae family) diversity on-farm

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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34 Dimensions

Readers on

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110 Mendeley
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Title
Exploiting indigenous knowledge of subsistence farmers’ for the management and conservation of Enset (Ensete ventricosum (Welw.) Cheesman) (musaceae family) diversity on-farm
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13002-016-0109-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zerihun Yemataw, Kassahun Tesfaye, Awole Zeberga, Guy Blomme

Abstract

Enset (Ensete ventricosum (Welw.) Cheesman) belongs to the order sctaminae, the family musaceae. The Musaceae family is subdivided into the genera Musa and Ensete. Enset is an important staple crop for about 20 million people in the country. Recent publications on enset ethnobotany are insignificant when compared to the diverse ethnolingustic communities in the country. Hence, this paper try to identify and document wealth of indigenous knowledge associated with the distribution, diversity, and management of enset in the country. The study was conducted in eight ethnic groups in the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples' Regional State. In order to identify and document wealth of indigenous knowledge, the data was collected mainly through individual interviews and direct on-farm participatory monitoring and observation with 320 farm households, key informant interviews. Relevant secondary data, literature and inter-personal data were collected from unpublished progress report from National Enset Research Project, elderly people and senior experts. Enset-based farming system is one of a major agricultural system in Ethiopia that serves as a backbone for at least ¼ of country's population. Farmers used three morphological characters, two growth attributes, disease resistance and five use values traits in folk classification and characterization of enset. A total of 312 folk landraces have been identified. The number of landraces cultivated on individual farms ranged from one to twenty eight (mean of 8.08 ± 0.93). All ethnic groups in the study area use five use categories in order of importance: kocho yield and quality, bulla quality, amicho use, fiber quality and medicinal/ritual value. Of the 312 landraces 245 landraces having more than two use types. Management and maintenance of on-farm enset diversity is influenced by systematic propagation of the landraces, exchange of planting material and selective pressure. It can be concluded that the existing farmers' knowledge on naming, classification and diversity should be complemented with maintenance of the creative dynamics of traditional knowledge and transmission of the knowledge are crucial for constructing sustainable management.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 110 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 11 10%
Researcher 7 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 5%
Other 19 17%
Unknown 29 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 28%
Environmental Science 7 6%
Arts and Humanities 6 5%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Other 24 22%
Unknown 33 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2018.
All research outputs
#6,131,737
of 18,883,809 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#307
of 694 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,101
of 278,551 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#3
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,883,809 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 694 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,551 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 7 of them.