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Lack of sleep as a contributor to obesity in adolescents: impacts on eating and activity behaviors

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
59 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
129 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
440 Mendeley
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Title
Lack of sleep as a contributor to obesity in adolescents: impacts on eating and activity behaviors
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0428-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jean-Philippe Chaput, Caroline Dutil

Abstract

Sleep is an important contributor to physical and mental health; however, chronic sleep deprivation has become common in adolescents, especially on weekdays. Adolescents aged 14-17 years are recommended to sleep between 8 and 10 h per night to maximize overall health and well-being. Although sleep needs may vary between individuals, sleep duration recommendations are important for surveillance and help inform policies, interventions, and the population of healthy sleep behaviors. Long sleepers are very rare among teenagers and sleeping too much is not a problem per se; only insufficient sleep is associated with adverse health outcomes in the pediatric population. Causes of insufficient sleep are numerous and chronic sleep deprivation poses a serious threat to the academic success, health and safety of adolescents. This article focuses on the link between insufficient sleep and obesity in adolescents. This "call to action" article argues that sleep should be taken more seriously by the public health community and by our society in general, i.e., given as much attention and resources as nutrition and physical activity. Not only that having a good night's sleep is as important as eating a healthy diet and being regularly physically active for overall health, but sleeping habits also impact eating and screen time behaviors and, therefore, can influence body weight control. Short sleep duration, poor sleep quality, and late bedtimes are all associated with excess food intake, poor diet quality, and obesity in adolescents. Sleep, sedentary behavior, physical activity and diet all interact and influence each other to ultimately impact health. A holistic approach to health (i.e., the whole day matters) targeting all of these behaviors synergistically is needed to optimize the impact of our interventions. Sleep is not a waste of time and sleep hygiene is an important factor to consider in the prevention and treatment of obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 59 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 440 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 438 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 94 21%
Student > Master 67 15%
Researcher 32 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 25 6%
Other 70 16%
Unknown 127 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 68 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 58 13%
Psychology 27 6%
Sports and Recreations 26 6%
Social Sciences 21 5%
Other 85 19%
Unknown 155 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 97. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2022.
All research outputs
#332,250
of 21,431,229 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#98
of 1,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,744
of 291,627 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,431,229 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,842 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,627 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them