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The cost-effectiveness of hospital-based telephone coaching for people with type 2 diabetes: a 10 year modelling analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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146 Mendeley
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Title
The cost-effectiveness of hospital-based telephone coaching for people with type 2 diabetes: a 10 year modelling analysis
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1645-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. E. Varney, D. Liew, T. J. Weiland, W. J. Inder, G. A. Jelinek

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a burdensome condition for individuals to live with and an increasingly costly condition for health services to treat. Cost-effective treatment strategies are required to delay the onset and slow the progression of diabetes related complications. The Diabetes Telephone Coaching Study (DTCS) demonstrated that telephone coaching is an intervention that may improve the risk factor status and diabetes management practices of people with T2DM. Measuring the cost effectiveness of this intervention is important to inform funding decisions that may facilitate the translation of this research into clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to assess the cost-effectiveness of telephone coaching, compared to usual diabetes care, in participants with poorly controlled T2DM. A cost utility analysis was undertaken using the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Outcomes Model to extrapolate outcomes collected at 6 months in the DTCS over a 10 year time horizon. The intervention's impact on life expectancy, quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) and costs was estimated. Costs were reported from a health system perspective. A 5 % discount rate was applied to all future costs and effects. One-way sensitivity analyses were conducted to reflect uncertainty surrounding key input parameters. The intervention dominated the control condition in the base-case analysis, contributing to cost savings of $3327 per participant, along with non-significant improvements in QALE (0.2 QALE) and life expectancy (0.3 years). The cost of delivering the telephone coaching intervention continuously, for 10 years, was fully recovered through cost savings and a trend towards net health benefits. Findings of cost savings and net health benefits are rare and should prove attractive to decision makers who will determine whether this intervention is implemented into clinical practice. ACTRN12609000075280.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 146 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 146 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 21%
Student > Bachelor 18 12%
Researcher 12 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 25 17%
Unknown 41 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 17%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 9 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 4%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Other 17 12%
Unknown 46 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2016.
All research outputs
#7,737,918
of 13,746,285 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,790
of 4,624 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,338
of 265,804 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#6
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,746,285 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,624 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,804 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.