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Noninvasive in-vivo tracing and imaging of transplanted stem cells for liver regeneration

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
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Title
Noninvasive in-vivo tracing and imaging of transplanted stem cells for liver regeneration
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13287-016-0396-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Panpan Cen, Jiajia Chen, Chenxia Hu, Linxiao Fan, Jie Wang, Lanjuan Li

Abstract

Terminal liver disease is a major cause of death globally. The only ultimate therapeutic approach is orthotopic liver transplant. Because of the innate defects of organ transplantation, stem cell-based therapy has emerged as an effective alternative, based on the capacity of stem cells for multilineage differentiation and their homing to injured sites. However, the disease etiology, cell type, timing of cellular graft, therapeutic dose, delivery route, and choice of endpoints have varied between studies, leading to different, even divergent, results. In-vivo cell imaging could therefore help us better understand the fate and behaviors of stem cells to optimize cell-based therapy for liver regeneration. The primary imaging techniques in preclinical or clinical studies have consisted of optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, radionuclide imaging, reporter gene imaging, and Y chromosome-based fluorescence in-situ hybridization imaging. More attention has been focused on developing new or modified imaging methods for longitudinal and high-efficiency tracing. Herein, we provide a descriptive overview of imaging modalities and discuss recent advances in the field of molecular imaging of intrahepatic stem cell grafts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 29%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Master 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 31%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 14%
Engineering 6 12%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,290,846
of 13,046,126 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#315
of 1,119 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,037
of 265,318 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#5
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,046,126 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,119 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,318 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.