↓ Skip to main content

Women’s and clinicians perspectives of presentation with reduced fetal movements: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Women’s and clinicians perspectives of presentation with reduced fetal movements: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1074-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

R. M. D. Smyth, W. Taylor, A. E. Heazell, C. Furber, M. Whitworth, T. Lavender

Abstract

Worldwide maternal perception of fetal movements has been used for many years to evaluate fetal wellbeing. It is intuitively regarded as an expression of fetal well-being as pregnancies in which women consistently report regular fetal movements have very low morbidity and mortality. Conversely, maternal perception of reduced fetal movements is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We sought to gain insight into pregnant women's and clinicians views and experiences of reduced movements. We performed qualitative semi-structured interviews with pregnant women who experienced reduced fetal movements in their current pregnancy and health professionals who provide maternity care. Our aim was to develop a better understanding of events, facilitators and barriers to presentation with reduced fetal movements. Data analysis was conducted using framework analysis principles. Twenty-one women and 10 clinicians were interviewed. The themes that emerged following the final coding were influences of social network, facilitators and barriers to presentation and the desire for normality. This study aids understanding about why women present with reduced movements and how they reach the decision to attend hospital. This should inform professionals' views and practice, such that appreciating and addressing women's concerns may reduce anxiety and make presentation with further reduced movements more likely, which is desirable as this group is at increased risk of adverse outcome. To address problems with information about normal and abnormal fetal movements, high-quality information is needed that is accessible to women and their families.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 19%
Student > Master 7 13%
Other 6 11%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 5 9%
Researcher 5 9%
Other 13 24%
Unknown 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 20%
Social Sciences 9 17%
Psychology 7 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 9 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 September 2016.
All research outputs
#6,414,646
of 8,454,083 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,460
of 1,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,833
of 253,247 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#73
of 86 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,454,083 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,716 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,247 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 86 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.