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Structural chromosome aberrations cause swelling of the nucleus

Overview of attention for article published in Genes and Environment, October 2016
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Title
Structural chromosome aberrations cause swelling of the nucleus
Published in
Genes and Environment, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s41021-016-0047-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenji Takeshita, Kenji Takeshita, Hiroaki I. Ogawa, Toshinari Maeda

Abstract

Carcinogens are known to cause swelling of the mammalian cell nucleus. However, the mechanism of the swelling and its toxicological significance have not been fully elucidated. Since nuclear swelling (NS hereafter) has been frequently observed in chromosomal aberration (CA hereafter) tests (in vitro), the relationship between NS and CAs was investigated in this study. In a short-term CA test using the fibroblast CHL cell line, the appearance of NS increased in a dose-dependent manner after exposure to six types of clastogens (mitomycin C, methyl methane sulfonate, 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine, benzo[a]pyrene, cyclophosphamide monohydrate, and 9,10-dimethyl-2-benzanthracene), and a strong correlation was found between NS (%) and CAs (%) at each dosage. Therefore, we hypothesized that clastogens cause NS in cultured mammalian cells, since the mouse lymphoma L5178Y cell line is known to have a similar sensitivity to clastogens. Thus, we measured NS for 14 compounds (clastogens) that are known to induce structural CAs, 4 aneugens, and 12 non-mutagenes. Almost all clastogens caused NS of more than 5 %, which increased in a dose-dependent manner. Among the aneugens, colchicine, and diethylstilbestrol caused the same level of NS % as the clastogens, while carbendazim and trichlorfon caused a similar level of NS % as the clastogens only at higher levels of cytotoxicity. Almost all the non-mutagens caused less than 5 % NS. These results strongly suggest that NS is mainly caused by structural aberrations in the nucleus during interphase of the cell cycle.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 50%
Unknown 2 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 25%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 25%
Unknown 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2016.
All research outputs
#14,286,879
of 17,897,867 outputs
Outputs from Genes and Environment
#51
of 80 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#200,377
of 278,123 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genes and Environment
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,897,867 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 80 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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