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Emergence of wheat blast in Bangladesh was caused by a South American lineage of Magnaporthe oryzae

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
55 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
227 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
222 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Emergence of wheat blast in Bangladesh was caused by a South American lineage of Magnaporthe oryzae
Published in
BMC Biology, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12915-016-0309-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Tofazzal Islam, Daniel Croll, Pierre Gladieux, Darren M. Soanes, Antoine Persoons, Pallab Bhattacharjee, Md. Shaid Hossain, Dipali Rani Gupta, Md. Mahbubur Rahman, M. Golam Mahboob, Nicola Cook, Moin U. Salam, Musrat Zahan Surovy, Vanessa Bueno Sancho, João Leodato Nunes Maciel, Antonio NhaniJúnior, Vanina Lilián Castroagudín, Juliana T. de Assis Reges, Paulo Cezar Ceresini, Sebastien Ravel, Ronny Kellner, Elisabeth Fournier, Didier Tharreau, Marc-Henri Lebrun, Bruce A. McDonald, Timothy Stitt, Daniel Swan, Nicholas J. Talbot, Diane G. O. Saunders, Joe Win, Sophien Kamoun

Abstract

In February 2016, a new fungal disease was spotted in wheat fields across eight districts in Bangladesh. The epidemic spread to an estimated 15,000 hectares, about 16 % of the cultivated wheat area in Bangladesh, with yield losses reaching up to 100 %. Within weeks of the onset of the epidemic, we performed transcriptome sequencing of symptomatic leaf samples collected directly from Bangladeshi fields. Reinoculation of seedlings with strains isolated from infected wheat grains showed wheat blast symptoms on leaves of wheat but not rice. Our phylogenomic and population genomic analyses revealed that the wheat blast outbreak in Bangladesh was most likely caused by a wheat-infecting South American lineage of the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Our findings suggest that genomic surveillance can be rapidly applied to monitor plant disease outbreaks and provide valuable information regarding the identity and origin of the infectious agent.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 55 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 222 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Uganda 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 217 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 22%
Researcher 39 18%
Student > Master 31 14%
Student > Bachelor 24 11%
Other 11 5%
Other 33 15%
Unknown 36 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 121 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 34 15%
Environmental Science 7 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 1%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 <1%
Other 12 5%
Unknown 43 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 68. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2021.
All research outputs
#420,302
of 19,026,578 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#108
of 1,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,654
of 279,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,026,578 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,653 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,956 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them