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Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) of the elbow: a controlled radiological study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2015
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Title
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) of the elbow: a controlled radiological study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12891-015-0575-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christine Beyeler, Sergio R Thomann, Niklaus J Gerber, Christine Kunze, Daniel Aeberli

Abstract

Extraspinal manifestations of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) have been described previously. We aimed to assess the prevalence of elbow hyperostotic spurs, to search for sites discriminating for elbow DISH and to analyze the effect of physical activities, handedness and sex. Out of 284 patients hospitalized for extraskeletal disorders, 85 patients (33 with and 52 without thoracospinal DISH) agreed to bilateral elbow X-rays in two projections. Clinical information was collected by a standardized questionnaire and X-rays were graded blindly. A total of 400 hyperostotic spurs (210 unilateral, 95 bilateral) were present at 11 predefined sites. The most frequent sites affected were the olecranon (20.8 %), lateral epicondyle (17.8 %) and medial epicondyle (15.5 %). In carriers of thoracospinal DISH significantly more hyperostotic spurs were present at the lateral and medial epicondyle compared to non-DISH carriers (OR 4.01 [95 % CI 1.35-12.34] and 2.88 [1.03-8.24], respectively). The olecranon, lateral and medial epicondyle contributed significantly to the classification of elbow DISH (OR 22.2 [4.1-144.7], 9.6 [1.9-61.2] and 10.1 [2.2-52.1], respectively). The prevalence of elbow hyperostotic spurs was higher in 45 patients with a history of heavy physical activities (24.4 % versus 18.0 %, OR 1.48 [1.17-1.86]), at the right elbow (24.2 % versus 18.6 %, OR 1.39 [1.11-1.75]) and in 62 males (22.8 % versus 17.6 %, OR 1.38 [1.06-1.81]). Hyperostotic spurs at the olecranon, lateral and medial epicondyle had the highest prevalence and disclosed the most pronounced discrimination for elbow DISH. Mechanical factors such as physical activities and handedness, and sex influenced the formation of these spurs.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 17%
Student > Master 2 11%
Professor 2 11%
Librarian 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Unknown 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Computer Science 1 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Unknown 6 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2018.
All research outputs
#11,120,660
of 12,504,607 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#2,280
of 2,491 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,951
of 265,402 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1
of 1 outputs
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