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Oxygen uptake, heart rate, perceived exertion, and integrated electromyogram of the lower and upper extremities during level and Nordic walking on a treadmill

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physiological Anthropology, February 2013
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Title
Oxygen uptake, heart rate, perceived exertion, and integrated electromyogram of the lower and upper extremities during level and Nordic walking on a treadmill
Published in
Journal of Physiological Anthropology, February 2013
DOI 10.1186/1880-6805-32-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Koji Sugiyama, Mami Kawamura, Hisato Tomita, Shizuo Katamoto

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to characterize responses in oxygen uptake ( V·O(2)), heart rate (HR), perceived exertion (OMNI scale) and integrated electromyogram (iEMG) readings during incremental Nordic walking (NW) and level walking (LW) on a treadmill. Ten healthy adults (four men, six women), who regularly engaged in physical activity in their daily lives, were enrolled in the study. All subjects were familiar with NW. Each subject began walking at 60 m/min for 3 minutes, with incremental increases of 10 m/min every 2 minutes up to 120 m/min V·O(2), V·(E) and HR were measured every 30 seconds, and the OMNI scale was used during the final 15 seconds of each exercise. EMG readings were recorded from the triceps brachii, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles. V·O(2) was significantly higher during NW than during LW, with the exception of the speed of 70 m/min (P < 0.01). V·E and HR were higher during NW than LW at all walking speeds (P < 0.05 to 0.001). OMNI scale of the upper extremities was significantly higher during NW than during LW at all speeds (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the iEMG reading for the VL was lower during NW than during LW at all walking speeds, while the iEMG reading for the BF and GA muscles were significantly lower during NW than LW at some speeds. These data suggest that the use of poles in NW attenuates muscle activity in the lower extremities during the stance and push-off phases, and decreases that of the lower extremities and increase energy expenditure of the upper body and respiratory system at certain walking speeds.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Unknown 62 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 14%
Other 7 11%
Researcher 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 18 28%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 28%
Sports and Recreations 12 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 14%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Unspecified 2 3%
Other 5 8%
Unknown 15 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 February 2013.
All research outputs
#2,741,995
of 3,630,009 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#61
of 79 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,494
of 84,930 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physiological Anthropology
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,630,009 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 84,930 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.