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Poverty, partner discord, and divergent accounts; a mixed methods account of births before arrival to health facilities in Morogoro Region, Tanzania

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
Poverty, partner discord, and divergent accounts; a mixed methods account of births before arrival to health facilities in Morogoro Region, Tanzania
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1058-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shannon A. McMahon, Rachel P. Chase, Peter J. Winch, Joy J. Chebet, Giulia V. R. Besana, Idda Mosha, Zaina Sheweji, Caitlin E. Kennedy

Abstract

Births before arrival (BBA) to health care facilities are associated with higher rates of perinatal morbidity and mortality compared to facility deliveries or planned home births. Research on such births has been conducted in several high-income countries, but there are almost no studies from low-income settings where a majority of maternal and newborn deaths occur. Drawing on a household survey of women and in-depth interviews with women and their partners, we examined the experience of BBA in rural districts of Morogoro Region, Tanzania. Among survey respondents, 59 births (4 %) were classified as BBAs. Most of these births occurred in the presence of a family member (47 %) or traditional birth attendant (24 %). Low socioeconomic status was the strongest predictor of BBA. After controlling for wealth via matching, high parity and a low number of antenatal care (ANC) visits retained statistical significance. While these variables are useful indicators of which women are at greater risk of BBA, their predictive power is limited in a context where many women are poor, multiparous, and make multiple ANC visits. In qualitative interviews, stories of BBAs included themes of partner disagreement regarding when to depart for facilities and financial or logistical constraints that underpinned departure delays. Women described wanting to depart earlier to facilities than partners. As efforts continue to promote facility birth, we highlight the financial demands associated with facility delivery and the potential for these demands to place women at a heightened risk for BBAs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 31%
Researcher 13 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 6 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 19 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 21%
Social Sciences 11 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 10 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,356,732
of 12,406,609 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,089
of 2,264 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,789
of 264,146 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,406,609 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,264 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,146 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them