↓ Skip to main content

Coxiella burnetii associated reproductive disorders in domestic animals-a critical review

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, February 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
118 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
150 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Coxiella burnetii associated reproductive disorders in domestic animals-a critical review
Published in
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, February 2013
DOI 10.1186/1751-0147-55-13
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jørgen S Agerholm

Abstract

The bacterium Coxiella burnetii has been detected in the fetal membranes, birth fluids and vaginal mucus, as well as in the milk and other excretions of several domestic mammals. The finding of C. burnetii in association with abortion, parturition and in the postpartum period has led to the hypothesis that C. burnetii causes a range of reproductive diseases. This review critically evaluates the scientific basis for this hypothesis in domestic mammals.The review demonstrates a solid evidence for the association between C. burnetii infection and sporadic cases of abortion, premature delivery, stillbirth and weak offspring in cattle, sheep and goats. C. burnetii induced in-herd epidemics of this complete expression of reproductive failure have been reported for sheep and goats, but not for cattle. The single entities occur only as part of the complex and not as single events such as generally increased stillbirth rate. Studies show that C. burnetii initially infects the placenta and that subsequent spread to the fetus may occur either haematogenous or by the amniotic-oral route. The consequences for the equine, porcine, canine and feline conceptus remains to the elucidated but that infection of the conceptus may occur is documented for most species. There is no solid evidence to support a hypothesis of C. burnetii causing disorders such as subfertility, endometritis/metritis, or retained fetal membranes in any kind of domestic animal species.There is a strong need to validate non-pathology based methods such as polymerase chain reaction for their use in diagnostic and research in relation to establishing C. burnetii as the cause of abortion and to adapt an appropriate study design and include adequate control animals when linking epidemiological findings to C. burnetii or when evaluating effects of vaccination in production herds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 150 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
Kenya 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 145 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 17%
Researcher 24 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 14%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 11%
Other 27 18%
Unknown 18 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 57 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 38 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 5%
Engineering 4 3%
Other 12 8%
Unknown 18 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 January 2015.
All research outputs
#2,549,246
of 6,228,821 outputs
Outputs from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#112
of 342 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,030
of 97,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#4
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,228,821 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 342 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 97,979 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.