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The associations between domain-specific sedentary behaviours and dietary habits in European adults: a cross-sectional analysis of the SPOTLIGHT survey

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, October 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
80 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
The associations between domain-specific sedentary behaviours and dietary habits in European adults: a cross-sectional analysis of the SPOTLIGHT survey
Published in
BMC Public Health, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3708-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sofie Compernolle, Katrien De Cocker, Pedro J. Teixeira, Jean-Michel Oppert, Célina Roda, Joreintje D. Mackenbach, Jeroen Lakerveld, Martin McKee, Ketevan Glonti, Harry Rutter, Helga Bardos, Greet Cardon, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij

Abstract

Sedentary behaviour has been associated with obesity and related chronic diseases. Disentangling the nature of this association is complicated due to interactions with other lifestyle factors, such as dietary habits, yet limited research has investigated the relation between domain-specific sedentary behaviours and dietary habits in adults. The aim of this paper was to examine the association between domain-specific sedentary behaviours and dietary habits in adults and to test the moderating effect of age and gender on this association. A total of 6,037 participants from five urban regions in Europe completed an online survey, of which 6,001 were included in the analyses. Multilevel mixed-effects logistic regression analyses were used to examine main associations and interaction effects. All domain-specific sedentary behaviours, except transport-related sitting time, were significantly related to dietary habits. In general, having a higher sitting time was related to having less healthy dietary habits, especially for television viewing. Gender did not moderate any of the relations, and age was only a significant moderator in the relation between other leisure sitting time and alcohol consumption. Domain-specific sitting behaviours were related to unhealthy dietary behaviours. However, the small effect sizes suggest that individual level behavioural interventions focusing on sedentary behaviour will not be sufficient to improve dietary habits. The fact that almost none of the associations were moderated by age or gender suggests that these associations, and possibly also the effects of interventions targeting both behaviours, may hold across age and gender groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 80 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 18%
Student > Master 12 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Researcher 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 16 20%
Unknown 18 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 15%
Social Sciences 6 8%
Sports and Recreations 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 26 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2016.
All research outputs
#4,258,997
of 15,918,484 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,604
of 10,942 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#81,111
of 272,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#6
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,918,484 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,942 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,834 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.