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Non-suicidal self-injury and emotion regulation: a review on facial emotion recognition and facial mimicry

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
188 Mendeley
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Title
Non-suicidal self-injury and emotion regulation: a review on facial emotion recognition and facial mimicry
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, February 2013
DOI 10.1186/1753-2000-7-5
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is an increasingly prevalent, clinically significant behavior in adolescents and can be associated with serious consequences for the afflicted person. Emotion regulation is considered its most frequent function. Because the symptoms of NSSI are common and cause impairment, it will be included in Section 3 disorders as a new disorder in the revised Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). So far, research has been conducted mostly with patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) showing self-injurious behavior. Therefore, for this review the current state of research regarding emotion regulation, NSSI, and BPD in adolescents is presented. In particular, the authors focus on studies on facial emotion recognition and facial mimicry, as social interaction difficulties might be a result of not recognizing emotions in facial expressions and inadequate facial mimicry. Although clinical trials investigating the efficacy of psychological treatments for NSSI among adolescents are lacking, especially those targeting the capacity to cope with emotions, clinical implications of the improvement in implicit and explicit emotion regulation in the treatment of NSSI is discussed. Given the impact of emotion regulation skills on the effectiveness of psychotherapy, neurobiological and psychophysiological outcome variables should be included in clinical trials.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 188 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 186 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 20%
Student > Bachelor 29 15%
Student > Master 24 13%
Researcher 23 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 7%
Other 36 19%
Unknown 25 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 103 55%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 10%
Social Sciences 9 5%
Neuroscience 5 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 3%
Other 19 10%
Unknown 29 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2013.
All research outputs
#3,334,800
of 8,025,465 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#138
of 309 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,541
of 116,520 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#7
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,025,465 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 309 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 116,520 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.