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Microtomography of the Baltic amber tick Ixodes succineus reveals affinities with the modern Asian disease vector Ixodes ovatus

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Microtomography of the Baltic amber tick Ixodes succineus reveals affinities with the modern Asian disease vector Ixodes ovatus
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12862-016-0777-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jason A. Dunlop, Dmitry A. Apanaskevich, Jens Lehmann, René Hoffmann, Florian Fusseis, Moritz Ehlke, Stefan Zachow, Xianghui Xiao

Abstract

Fossil ticks are extremely rare and Ixodes succineus Weidner, 1964 from Eocene (ca. 44-49 Ma) Baltic amber is one of the oldest examples of a living hard tick genus (Ixodida: Ixodidae). Previous work suggested it was most closely related to the modern and widespread European sheep tick Ixodes ricinus (Linneaus, 1758). Restudy using phase contrast synchrotron x-ray tomography yielded images of exceptional quality. These confirm the fossil's referral to Ixodes Latreille, 1795, but the characters resolved here suggest instead affinities with the Asian subgenus Partipalpiger Hoogstraal et al., 1973 and its single living (and medically significant) species Ixodes ovatus Neumann, 1899. We redescribe the amber fossil here as Ixodes (Partipalpiger) succineus. Our data suggest that Ixodes ricinus is unlikely to be directly derived from Weidner's amber species, but instead reveals that the Partipalpiger lineage was originally more widely distributed across the northern hemisphere. The closeness of Ixodes (P.) succineus to a living vector of a wide range of pathogens offers the potential to correlate its spatial and temporal position (northern Europe, nearly 50 million years ago) with the estimated origination dates of various tick-borne diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 6%
Unknown 29 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 23%
Researcher 6 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Professor 3 10%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 19%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2021.
All research outputs
#1,578,040
of 19,965,580 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#369
of 2,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,223
of 289,411 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,965,580 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,859 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,411 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
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