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Neural and psychosocial contributions to sex differences in knee osteoarthritic pain

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, December 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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24 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Neural and psychosocial contributions to sex differences in knee osteoarthritic pain
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, December 2012
DOI 10.1186/2042-6410-3-26
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sluka KA, Berkley KJ, O'Connor MJ, Nicolella DP, Enoka RM, Boyan BD, Hart DA, Resnick E, Kwoh CK, Tosi LL, Coutts RD, Kohrt WM

Abstract

People with osteoarthritis (OA) can have significant pain that interferes with function and quality of life. Women with knee OA have greater pain and greater reductions in function and quality of life than men. In many cases, OA pain is directly related to sensitization and activation of nociceptors in the injured joint and correlates with the degree of joint effusion and synovial thickening. In some patients, however, the pain does not match the degree of injury and continues after removal of the nociceptors with a total joint replacement. Growth of new nociceptors, activation of nociceptors in the subchondral bone exposed after cartilage degradation, and nociceptors innervating synovium sensitized by inflammatory mediators could all augment the peripheral input to the central nervous system and result in pain. Enhanced central excitability and reduced central inhibition could lead to prolonged and enhanced pain that does not directly match the degree of injury. Psychosocial variables can influence pain and contribute to pain variability. This review explores the neural and psychosocial factors that contribute to knee OA pain with an emphasis on differences between the sexes and gaps in knowledge.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 21%
Student > Master 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 13 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Sports and Recreations 4 8%
Neuroscience 3 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 16 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2015.
All research outputs
#4,542,398
of 9,723,944 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#96
of 171 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,379
of 123,636 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#6
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,723,944 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 171 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,636 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.