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Prospective longitudinal course of cognition in older subjects with mild parkinsonian signs

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
64 Mendeley
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Title
Prospective longitudinal course of cognition in older subjects with mild parkinsonian signs
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13195-016-0209-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stefanie Lerche, Kathrin Brockmann, Andrea Pilotto, Isabel Wurster, Ulrike Sünkel, Markus A. Hobert, Anna-Katharina von Thaler, Claudia Schulte, Erik Stoops, Hugo Vanderstichele, Victor Herbst, Britta Brix, Gerhard W. Eschweiler, Florian G. Metzger, Walter Maetzler, Daniela Berg

Abstract

Mild parkinsonian signs (MPS) are common in older people and are associated with an increased risk of different neurodegenerative diseases. This study prospectively evaluates the longitudinal course of cognitive performance in older individuals with MPS. From the TREND study, 480 individuals neurologically healthy at baseline, aged between 50 and 80 years, with complete follow-up data for three assessments within a mean of 43.8 months, were included in this analysis. Participants underwent a detailed cognitive test battery, evaluation of prodromal markers for neurodegenerative diseases and history of vascular diseases at each study visit. In addition, plasma levels of amyloid-beta (Aβ)1-40 and Aβ1-42 were evaluated longitudinally. In 52 (11 %) of the 480 participants, MPS could be detected at baseline. These individuals had cognitive deficits significantly more often compared with controls at each time point and their cognitive performance showed a steeper decline during follow-up. In addition, their levels of plasma Aβ1-42 were significantly lower than those of controls, and declined more rapidly over time. This longitudinal study shows that MPS are associated with cognitive decline and decrease in plasma Aβ1-42, possibly indicating an ongoing neurodegenerative process.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 64 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 64 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Other 7 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Student > Master 6 9%
Researcher 4 6%
Other 12 19%
Unknown 21 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 22%
Neuroscience 9 14%
Psychology 8 13%
Unspecified 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 25 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2017.
All research outputs
#1,278,395
of 11,991,714 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#229
of 502 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#44,641
of 260,902 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#4
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,991,714 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 502 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,902 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.