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Near-infrared spectroscopy for assessing tissue oxygenation and microvascular reactivity in critically ill patients: a prospective observational study

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
85 Mendeley
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Title
Near-infrared spectroscopy for assessing tissue oxygenation and microvascular reactivity in critically ill patients: a prospective observational study
Published in
Critical Care, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1500-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abele Donati, Elisa Damiani, Roberta Domizi, Claudia Scorcella, Andrea Carsetti, Stefania Tondi, Valentina Monaldi, Erica Adrario, Rocco Romano, Paolo Pelaia, Mervyn Singer

Abstract

Impaired microcirculatory perfusion and tissue oxygenation during critical illness are associated with adverse outcome. The aim of this study was to detect alterations in tissue oxygenation or microvascular reactivity and their ability to predict outcome in critically ill patients using thenar near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with a vascular occlusion test (VOT). Prospective observational study in critically ill adults admitted to a 12-bed intensive care unit (ICU) of a University Hospital. NIRS with a VOT (using a 40 % tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) target) was applied daily until discharge from the ICU or death. A group of healthy volunteers were evaluated in a single session. During occlusion, StO2 downslope was measured separately for the first (downslope 1) and last part (downslope 2) of the desaturation curve. The difference between downslope 2 and 1 was calculated (delta-downslope). The upslope and area of the hyperaemic phase (receive operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) of StO2) were calculated, reflecting microvascular reactivity. Outcomes were ICU and 90-day mortality. Patients (n = 89) had altered downslopes and upslopes compared to healthy volunteers (n = 27). Mean delta-downslope was higher in ICU non-survivors (2.8 (0.4, 3.8) %/minute versus 0.4 (-0.8, 1.8) in survivors, p = 0.004) and discriminated 90-day mortality (ROC AUC 0.72 (95 % confidence interval 0.59, 0.84)). ICU non-survivors had lower mean upslope (141 (75, 193) %/minute versus 185 (143, 217) in survivors, p = 0.016) and AUC StO2 (7.9 (4.3, 12.6) versus 14.5 (11.2, 21.3), p = 0.001). Upslope and AUC StO2 on admission were significant although weak predictors of 90-day mortality (ROC AUC = 0.68 (0.54, 0.82) and 0.70 (0.58, 0.82), respectively). AUC StO2 ≤ 6.65 (1st quartile) on admission was independently associated with higher 90-day mortality (hazard ratio 7.964 (95 % CI 2.211, 28.686)). The lowest upslope in the ICU was independently associated with survival after ICU discharge (odds ratio 0.970 (95 % CI 0.945, 0.996)). In critically ill patients, NIRS with a VOT enables identification of alterations in tissue oxygen extraction capacity and microvascular reactivity that can predict mortality. NCT02649088, www.clinicaltrials.gov , date of registration 23rd December 2015, retrospectively registered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 84 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Student > Postgraduate 8 9%
Other 7 8%
Student > Master 7 8%
Researcher 7 8%
Other 26 31%
Unknown 16 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 48 56%
Sports and Recreations 4 5%
Neuroscience 3 4%
Engineering 3 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 17 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,072,321
of 13,523,960 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#1,695
of 4,310 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,458
of 270,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#46
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,523,960 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,310 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,085 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.