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Interrelationships among common symptoms in the elderly and their effects on health-related quality of life: a cross-sectional study in rural Korea

Overview of attention for article published in Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, October 2016
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1 tweeter
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1 Redditor

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Title
Interrelationships among common symptoms in the elderly and their effects on health-related quality of life: a cross-sectional study in rural Korea
Published in
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12955-016-0549-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sujeong Mun, Kihyun Park, Younghwa Baek, Siwoo Lee, Jong-hyang Yoo

Abstract

Because the world population is aging, it has become increasingly important to focus on and meet the healthcare needs of elderly individuals. This study aims to evaluate the relationships among common symptoms experienced by the elderly, including fatigue, pain, sleep disturbance, indigestion, and depression/anger/anxiety, and to assess how these symptoms affect health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the elderly population after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and diagnosed diseases. In a cross-sectional study conducted in 2014 in a rural area of Korea, we extracted data on 1328 elderly individuals aged 60 years or older. Their HRQoL was assessed using the EuroQol Five-Dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaire. The pairwise associations between each symptom and the influence of the symptoms on HRQoL were measured using logistic regression and multiple regression analysis. Each symptom was positively correlated with the other symptoms. The strongest association was observed between fatigue and pain (adjusted odds ratio = 8.127), and the weakest correlation was observed between sleep and indigestion (adjusted odds ratio = 2.521). Of the individuals experiencing symptoms other than sleep disturbance, those who reported comorbid symptoms tended to report higher symptom severity and a higher prevalence of symptoms persisting for ≥ 3 days compared with individuals who reported only one symptom. The number of symptoms was significantly correlated with the EQ-5D index (Spearman correlation coefficient = -0.370, p < 0.01) and the EQ Visual Analog Scale (EQ VAS) scores (Spearman correlation coefficient = -0.226, p < 0.01). Fatigue, pain, and sleep disturbance showed negative effects on all dimensions of EQ-5D. In multiple regression analysis, fatigue (β = -0.073, p < 0.01), pain (β = -0.140, p < 0.01), sleep disturbance (β = -0.061, p < 0.05), and depression/anger/anxiety (β = -0.065, p < 0.05) showed significant independent effects on the EQ-5D index when we adjusted for socioeconomic characteristics and diagnosed diseases. Fatigue, pain, sleep disturbance, and depression/anger/anxiety were correlated with one another, and they presented significant independent effects on the HRQoL of elderly individuals. Thus, multidisciplinary healthcare programs are required to address these common symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 10 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 15%
Researcher 7 11%
Student > Master 7 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 3%
Other 10 16%
Unknown 16 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Psychology 3 5%
Sports and Recreations 3 5%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 22 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2016.
All research outputs
#11,778,655
of 15,442,255 outputs
Outputs from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#1,049
of 1,660 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#178,668
of 270,801 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,442,255 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,660 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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