↓ Skip to main content

Recurrent evolution of heat-responsiveness in Brassicaceae COPIA elements

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), October 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
90 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Recurrent evolution of heat-responsiveness in Brassicaceae COPIA elements
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), October 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13059-016-1072-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Björn Pietzenuk, Catarine Markus, Hervé Gaubert, Navratan Bagwan, Aldo Merotto, Etienne Bucher, Ales Pecinka

Abstract

The mobilization of transposable elements (TEs) is suppressed by host genome defense mechanisms. Recent studies showed that the cis-regulatory region of Arabidopsis thaliana COPIA78/ONSEN retrotransposons contains heat-responsive elements (HREs), which cause their activation during heat stress. However, it remains unknown whether this is a common and potentially conserved trait and how it has evolved. We show that ONSEN, COPIA37, TERESTRA, and ROMANIAT5 are the major families of heat-responsive TEs in A. lyrata and A. thaliana. Heat-responsiveness of COPIA families is correlated with the presence of putative high affinity heat shock factor binding HREs within their long terminal repeats in seven Brassicaceae species. The strong HRE of ONSEN is conserved over millions of years and has evolved by duplication of a proto-HRE sequence, which was already present early in the evolution of the Brassicaceae. However, HREs of most families are species-specific, and in Boechera stricta, the ONSEN HRE accumulated mutations and lost heat-responsiveness. Gain of HREs does not always provide an ultimate selective advantage for TEs, but may increase the probability of their long-term survival during the co-evolution of hosts and genomic parasites.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Czechia 1 1%
Chile 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Unknown 83 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 20%
Student > Master 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Student > Postgraduate 4 4%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 14 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 43 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 27%
Computer Science 2 2%
Arts and Humanities 1 1%
Environmental Science 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 18 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2016.
All research outputs
#3,005,827
of 18,696,335 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#2,143
of 3,743 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,598
of 279,987 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,696,335 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,743 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.8. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,987 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them