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Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, March 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#35 of 2,468)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
287 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
213 Mendeley
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Title
Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, March 2007
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-2-13
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karine Morcel, Laure Camborieux, Daniel Guerrier

Abstract

The Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome is characterized by congenital aplasia of the uterus and the upper part (2/3) of the vagina in women showing normal development of secondary sexual characteristics and a normal 46, XX karyotype. It affects at least 1 out of 4500 women. MRKH may be isolated (type I) but it is more frequently associated with renal, vertebral, and, to a lesser extent, auditory and cardiac defects (MRKH type II or MURCS association). The first sign of MRKH syndrome is a primary amenorrhea in young women presenting otherwise with normal development of secondary sexual characteristics and normal external genitalia, with normal and functional ovaries, and karyotype 46, XX without visible chromosomal anomaly. The phenotypic manifestations of MRKH syndrome overlap with various other syndromes or associations and thus require accurate delineation. For a long time the syndrome has been considered as a sporadic anomaly, but increasing number of familial cases now support the hypothesis of a genetic cause. In familial cases, the syndrome appears to be transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. This suggests the involvement of either mutations in a major developmental gene or a limited chromosomal imbalance. However, the etiology of MRKH syndrome still remains unclear. Treatment of vaginal aplasia, which consists in creation of a neovagina, can be offered to allow sexual intercourse. As psychological distress is very important in young women with MRKH, it is essential for the patients and their families to attend counseling before and throughout treatment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 213 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Unknown 207 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 41 19%
Student > Master 25 12%
Researcher 20 9%
Student > Postgraduate 19 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 6%
Other 46 22%
Unknown 49 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 99 46%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 7%
Psychology 7 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 2%
Other 15 7%
Unknown 55 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 70. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2022.
All research outputs
#479,485
of 21,786,000 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#35
of 2,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,145
of 170,747 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,786,000 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,468 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 170,747 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them