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Impact of the primary care curriculum and its teaching formats on medical students’ perception of primary care: a cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, September 2016
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Title
Impact of the primary care curriculum and its teaching formats on medical students’ perception of primary care: a cross-sectional study
Published in
BMC Family Practice, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12875-016-0532-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher Chung, Hubert Maisonneuve, Eva Pfarrwaller, Marie-Claude Audétat, Alain Birchmeier, Lilli Herzig, Thomas Bischoff, Johanna Sommer, Dagmar M. Haller

Abstract

Switzerland is facing an impending primary care workforce crisis since almost half of all primary care physicians are expected to retire in the next decade. Only a minority of medical students choose a primary care specialty, further deepening the workforce shortage. It is therefore essential to identify ways to promote the choice of a primary care career. The aim of the present study was to explore students' views about the undergraduate primary care teaching curriculum and different teaching formats, and to evaluate the possible impact of these views on students' perceptions of primary care. We surveyed fifth year medical students from the Medical Faculties in Geneva and Lausanne, Switzerland (n = 285) with a four sections electronic questionnaire. We carried out descriptive analyses presented as frequencies for categorical data, and means and/or medians for continuous data. The response rate was 43 %. Overall, primary care teaching had a positive impact on students' image of primary care. In Lausanne, primary care curricular components were rated more positively than in Geneva. Curricular components that were not part of the primary care teaching, but were nevertheless cited by some students, were frequently perceived as having a negative impact. The primary care curriculum at Lausanne and Geneva Universities positively influences students' perceptions of this discipline. However, there are shortcomings in both the structure and the content of both the primary care and hidden curriculum that may contribute to perpetuating a negative image of this specialization.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 57 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 22%
Student > Bachelor 10 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 10%
Researcher 4 7%
Unspecified 3 5%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 9 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 52%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Unspecified 3 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 10 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2016.
All research outputs
#20,346,264
of 22,893,031 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#1,746
of 1,857 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#278,688
of 321,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#32
of 34 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.