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Molecular basis for prey relocation in viperid snakes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, March 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Citations

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99 Mendeley
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Title
Molecular basis for prey relocation in viperid snakes
Published in
BMC Biology, March 2013
DOI 10.1186/1741-7007-11-20
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony J Saviola, David Chiszar, Chardelle Busch, Stephen P Mackessy

Abstract

Vertebrate predators use a broad arsenal of behaviors and weaponry for overcoming fractious and potentially dangerous prey. A unique array of predatory strategies occur among snakes, ranging from mechanical modes of constriction and jaw-holding in non-venomous snakes, to a chemical means, venom, for quickly dispatching prey. However, even among venomous snakes, different prey handling strategies are utilized, varying from the strike-and-hold behaviors exhibited by highly toxic elapid snakes to the rapid strike-and-release envenomation seen in viperid snakes. For vipers, this mode of envenomation represents a minimal risk predatory strategy by permitting little contact with or retaliation from prey, but it adds the additional task of relocating envenomated prey which has wandered from the attack site. This task is further confounded by trails of other unstruck conspecific or heterospecific prey. Despite decades of behavioral study, researchers still do not know the molecular mechanism which allows for prey relocation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 99 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Sudan 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Unknown 93 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 19%
Student > Master 15 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 12%
Professor 6 6%
Other 19 19%
Unknown 8 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 54 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 16%
Environmental Science 5 5%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Chemistry 2 2%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 10 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 46. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2016.
All research outputs
#609,339
of 18,837,663 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#153
of 1,626 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,688
of 163,988 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,837,663 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,626 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 163,988 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them